11 votes

Why asexual reproduction?

When you say, why don't we see more sexually reproducing species than asexual, I presume you are referring to bacteria, protists, archaea, some fungi, etc. Most multicellular organisims do reproduce ...
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9 votes
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What defines a microbial species?

Your question is relative to the species concept that you are using. Mayr's biological species concept (BSC) is based on the ability to interbreed; a process-based definition. Most biologists use it, ...
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6 votes
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Is Parthenogenesis known as Sexual reproduction or Asexual reproduction?

Only a matter of definition It is only a matter of definition. When it comes to sex, there is such a diversity of mating system that it is very hard to make a good definition that won't be challenged ...
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6 votes

Why asexual reproduction?

This just in addition to @anongoodnurse's excellent answer. It was mentioned in the OP that asexual organisms do not undergo recombination; this is not true. Recombination is used for integration of ...
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4 votes

Why can't complex multicellular organisms reproduce by regeneration?

Not all complex organisms are incapable of regeneration! The most famous example is probably the axolotl - a salamander that is able to regrow whole limbs or even parts of essential organs like the ...
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  • 4,296
4 votes
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Why can't complex multicellular organisms reproduce by regeneration?

I was doing some research on this myself and from what I had found, the body has hox genes that direct the formation of body parts. So now the obvious question is that if a body part contains stem ...
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  • 251
4 votes
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can self-fertilization in flowers be called asexual reproduction?

According to this article from Berkeley, asexual reproduction is: Any reproductive process that does not involve meiosis or syngamy Using this definition of asexual reproduction and knowing self-...
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  • 598
3 votes

Why does the seed of the coconut tree have a liquid in it?

It is a transitory state. During coconut development the "milk" actually starts as a spongy solid a multinucleate endosperm. As the coconut develops it absorbs this tissue. Because of a coconuts ...
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3 votes

How do you consider an organism to be a new species?

There are various hypotheses and concepts proposed to define a species, but no definitive answer. Mostly a combination of these concepts are used because each hypothesis has exceptions. Classification ...
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3 votes

Can any organism possibly have the capability to create a new species every time it reproduces?

Concept of species First have a look at How could humans have interbred with Neanderthals if we're a different species? to better understand the concept of species. I will assume that you are using ...
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2 votes

Polyploidy, or why plants of different species can produce fertile offspring hybrids more frequently than animals?

While I do not know if there is a definitive answer to this question, I suspect that at least part of the answer can be found in the fact that animals typically have much more complex and delicate ...
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  • 6,937
2 votes

What defines a microbial species?

This question actually does not have an easy answer. As indicated in a previous answer, the 16S rRNA gene is used by many scientists. Since this is a fairly conserved genetic region, mutations in this ...
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  • 76
2 votes
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What is intercalary mitosis in bacteria?

To define, intercalary differentiation or mitosis applies to any cytogenesis through mitosis which arises between different specialised tissues or cells. Spirogyra may undertake either sexual ...
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2 votes

Can any organism possibly have the capability to create a new species every time it reproduces?

Absolutely impossible. There are several basic reasons: 1. Genetic modification isn't that simple Not going to go into the mechanics of it, but suffice it to say that you can't perform genetic ...
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  • 2,711
2 votes

Binary fission in amoeba

In binary fission, the fully grown parent cell splits into two halves, producing two new cells. After replicating its genetic material, the cell divides into two nearly equal sized daughter cells. The ...
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2 votes

How do asexually reproductive organisms mutate?

It is not necessary that no mutation occurs in the system where no gene recombination or "contaminant" takes place. There are mutations (which are sudden abrupt inheritable changes) There can be ...
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2 votes
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Does Human being have potential to perform parthenogenesis?

'Possible' is a tricky word here. There are a lot of things that are possible that just don't happen, because they are so exceedingly rare; or that happen but are unknown because they are hard to spot....
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2 votes
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Will Fst (inbreeding coefficient) always be a value close or at 0 in asexual populations?

It depends on whether mutation exists. Generally mutation is happening in biology, but in its absence, yes it will be at or near zero: Note that in the absence of any mutation, $F_{ST}$ would be ...
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2 votes

Multiple fission and spore formation

All the organisms shown in the figure reproduce asexually. (A) is Penicillium in which non-motile conidia are produced singly or in chains. Organism (B) is Chlamydomonas in which reproduction occurs ...
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1 vote
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What does this statement pertaining to fission mean?

You're right, this makes no sense or at least is misleading. It seems the edit was introduced in March 2019, after another mistaken edit that suggested parental identity was preserved in binary ...
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1 vote

What does this statement pertaining to fission mean?

In fission, each daughter cell gets a full copy of the parental genome. But "parental identity" doesn't seem to be a standard term. What does 'parental identity' mean here? You're not ...
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1 vote
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How do plants that reproduce with artificial vegetative propagation grow in nature?

Rose species reproduce perfectly well in nature, by the normal means of seeds and suckering. For instance, Rosa woodsii is found growing along streams throughout the western US: https://www....
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1 vote

Evolution of sexual reproduction from asexual

Sexual vs asexual is not a binary condition it is a spectrum. Many organisms do both and/or a wide range of things in between. One of the most basic is plasmid swapping Bacterial conjunction in ...
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1 vote

Evolution of sexual reproduction from asexual

Sexual reproduction is a process where two cells fuse to form a diploid cell. Unicellular organisms (or even multicellular lower organisms like alga, fungi and protists) prefers to reproduce by ...
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  • 305
1 vote

Why asexual reproduction?

Sexual reproduction probably evolved because an asexually reproducing species of bacteria evolved an evolutionary stable strategy and then there was a rapid change in the environment and only the ...
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