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7 votes

Longevity and extent of transfection after SARS-COV-2 vaccination with Janssen

Both the AstraZeneca (AZ) and Janssen (J) vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 work by using what is known as a viral vector to generate an immune response. In both cases these vaccines use an Adenovirus as ...
bob1's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does damage to myelin sheath in multiple sclerosis lead to a decrease in information reaching the brain from sensory receptors?

As you write in your question, myelin is an insulating sheath that speeds neuronal transmission. However, the mechanism for transmission in myelinated axons is very different from unmyelinated fibers. ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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4 votes
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How are Thyroid Stimulating Ab destroying thyroid tissues?

Thyroid stimulating antibodies (sTRAb) don't destroy thyroid tissue. To the contrary, they have a TSH-like effect on thyrocytes and therefore lead to hyperthyroidism and thyroid growth resulting in ...
jwdietrich's user avatar
3 votes
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Where happens MHCII coordination to a self-peptide, and what happens if the bond would be irreversible?

It appears that in cases self-pepties are bound to the MHC-II proteins (say HLA-DP2) when they are at the surface already. Where do such self-peptides come from? Class II MHC molecules are capable of ...
guest's user avatar
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3 votes
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How exactly does a prion cause disease?

I agree with commenter Martin Klvana, but there are a couple things going on here I wanted to touch on: I think that your second quote is making an error in saying that if prions cause immune ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
2 votes
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How is the antigen against which autoantibodies are formed, identified?

All of the above, basically. If it's a protein antigen, you can perform an immunoprecipitation with the auto-antibody and use any one (or more) of several methods (Western blot, various methods of ...
MattDMo's user avatar
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2 votes
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What goes wrong in the immune system that leads to autoimmune diseases

Your understanding of the process is basically correct. There are of course a lot more details to it, but that wouldn't be in the scope of the question. Do note that only T cells mature in the thymus (...
Nicolai's user avatar
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2 votes
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How do B and T cells work incorrectly in a person with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

The initial trigger for the disease is unknown and can be different from person to person. However, we do know that there can be environmental or infectious triggers that are further potentiated by ...
Polymania's user avatar
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2 votes

Why are certain cells more likely to be attacked in autoimmune conditions?

Autoimmune reactions each have their target antigens. They'll "attack" wherever those antigens are expressed. In the case of Type 1 diabetes, many specific antigens have been identified, and ...
MattDMo's user avatar
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2 votes

Meaning of units in ELISA based tests?

The ELISA kits are calibrated to meet the requirements of internationally certified laboratories such as Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) associated with FDA. In most cases, the ...
Maxim Masiutin's user avatar
2 votes

Is tumor necrosing factor alpha now properly referred to as "tumor necrosing factor"?

In papers I've participated in recently we've called it TNF╬▒. No reviewer has corrected us as far as I can recall. Near as I can tell, we've done this because we do not read the HUGO Gene Nomenclature ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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2 votes

How is Vitamin D deficiency linked to multiple sclerosis?

I don't believe this is known mechanistically to any great degree. Mayo Clinic has an easily understandable post about this. In summary, the evidence for a relationship is that vitamin D levels ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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1 vote

Why does damage to myelin sheath in multiple sclerosis lead to a decrease in information reaching the brain from sensory receptors?

I will try to explain in layman's terms Myelin sheath is the protective covering which basically works like the rubber insulation of a typical electrical wire. Now here's how the impulse in neuron ...
TheFatCat06's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Do all IgG autoantibodies lead to autoimmune diseases?

As usual with biology, it's not that simple. There are autoantibodies present even in people without any signs of autoimmune disease. The immune system is a complex network of positive and negative ...
Armand's user avatar
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1 vote

Could bone marrow transplants help make xenotransplants viable?

I feel I've enough sources & data to venture an answer on this one myself now, so here goes. Step one: Can we produce the pig in the first place? Fetal Inoculation With Donor Cells in Cardiac ...
Pelinore's user avatar
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1 vote
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Where are epitopes located on HLA molecules?

T cells in a graft see both non-self peptides associated with the non-self HLA molecules, and can also see the non-self HLA molecules regardless of peptide. (MHC is a broader term than HLA, and I will ...
iayork's user avatar
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1 vote

How are Thyroid Stimulating Ab destroying thyroid tissues?

In an autoimmune disorder body tissues are not necessarily damaged, the immune system can also cause Altered organ growth Altered organ function Grave's disease is a result of altered ...
Tyto alba's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it possible to transfer acquired hemophilia with breast milk?

Acquired Hemophilia is an AutoImmune Disease, hence it is possible to transfer it from mother to child through breastfeeding milk. The antibodies subjected to autoimmune disease also passes into the ...
James's user avatar
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