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It's common for the reservoir host of a zoonotic virus to be tolerant of it. MERS coronavirus appears to cause mild or no disease in dromedary camels ( source ), but kills about 35% of confirmed infected humans. ( CDC ) Sin Nombre hantavirus seems to be mild in the deer mice that spread it, despite ~36% fatality rate in humans. ( source ) Mosquitoes are ...


11

The preponderance of links between bat and human pathogens has led to a debate about whether bats disproportionately contribute to emerging viral infections crossing the species barrier into humans (26–30). Given the diversity of the Chiroptera order (Figure ​(Figure1),1), we may simply see more bat viruses because there are so many (>1,300) species of bats (...


9

It's been tentatively proposed that bats are often unusually able to tolerate long-term infection with a wide range of viruses (though this hasn't been formally shown to be true). A specific cause for this (possible) phenomenon isn't known, but many possible explanations have been put forward. It's likely that if it's true, there's no single cause but rather ...


3

Short answer Appears to be an evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) or little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Long answer. You can see a list of common bat species in Georgia through the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (A high-res image of a visual poster can be seen here). According to Greenhall and Frantz (1994)1, three of the species found in ...


2

It is possible, but unconfirmed, that the first incidents of SARS-CoV were directly infected by bats, and that palm civits were infected parallelly: The new study demonstrates that Chinese horseshoe bats harbor a pair of SARS like viruses that are very closely related to the strain that caused the 2003-2004 pandemic and that these strains have the ...


2

The following paper proposes that the bat borne viruses evolve to rapidly-transmit as a response to their robust immune systems: We carried out virus infectivity assays on bat cell lines expressing induced and constitutive immune phenotypes, then developed a theoretical model of our in vitro system, which we fit to empirical data. Best fit models ...


1

Depends completely on how good ultrasound you are producing. Will they interpret your signal as an obstacle ? Not really until you produce signals exactly calculated for the distance and speed of bat from obstacle. Here something known as dopler effect will come into play which will make bats understand probably thats not their sound. Otherwise every bat ...


1

Yes, some bat species can distinguish the species of insects by echolocation. One of the better studied species is the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum). Echolocating greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) detect insects by concentrating on the characteristic amplitude- and frequency modulation pattern fluttering insects impose ...


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