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19

(my comment reiterating the answer seemed useful, so I've reproduced it here) There are "NMDA receptors" in our body. There is not NMDA naturally in our body*. "NMDA receptor" is just a name people gave to one of the receptors that normally binds glutamate. They could have called it something else, like the "slow glu receptor", or "Glutamate Receptor A", ...


5

Specific parts — moieties — of an agonist molecule bind to the receptor protein, causing the receptor to change shape, which in turn initiates a signaling pathway inside the cell. Some agonists are better at causing the receptor to change to its "optimal shape" for relaying signal. These are called "full agonists". Other agonists cause a partial change in ...


4

The two techniques serve different purposes: IP: purifies a protein WB: visualizes or quantifies a protein Most often when I have done IPs (in the hazy past) I have turned around and run the protein out on a WB, so one will frequently combine both techniques. Sometimes a protein is very low abundance so you will not see it in a small volume of crude cell ...


2

I'll try to explain this to you, but you should really look it up here: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/beta-Levulose#section=3D-Conformer&fullscreen=true This is the structure of beta-D-fructofuranose, as a 3D conformer. On paper, or as a 2D figure, we cannot visualize the -OH groups at positions 3 and 4. They appear to be inside/outside ...


2

Usually you would want to keep the amount same, not the concentration. However, if you still want the concentration to be the same then you can add suitable amounts of PBS or your lysis buffer. For e.g. if you have two samples with 1mg/ml and 4mg/ml concentrations and you want to load 20μg of total protein, then you can take 20μl of first sample and add ...


1

There is no clear-cut line between "synthetic" and "natural" substances. They are made from the same kinds of atoms using the same kinds of covalent, ionic, and other types of bonds. The fact that a substance MAY be produced by some organism by biological processes does not make it any different from the same substance made in a laboratory by a human ...


1

Speaking specifically about blueberry bushes as a perhaps extreme example, they thrive in acidic soil and nitrogen-laden soil. However, dog urine is bad for blueberries, as the high nitrogen content overwhelms the plant and damages fruit production. Dog urine is only slightly acidic (pH 6-6.5) and can often be alkaline, which also changes the soil acidity in ...


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