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I am not sure what you read as you have not supplied any references, but humans are not 90% bacterial cells. (OP subsequently provided; see Edit 2) Humans are 100% human cells, however for every one human cell, approximately 10 single celled organisms (Bacteria or Fungi) live in (colloquially) or on the human body. This is referred to as the microbiome. You ...


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Two different species can have the same species epithet if they belong to different genera ('species name' is referring to the full binomial name). Consider for example Pinus glabra and Ilex glabra P. glabra I. glabra Two species can be have the same genus name (meaning they belong to the same genus) and will therefore necessarily have different species ...


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This is a widespread issue amongst binomial names. Only the full binomial name has to be unique in nomenclature, and therefore many genera contain different organisms with the same specific epithet. As Remi.b has already mentioned, two organisms with binomial names that have the same species but different genus are very likely more different from each other ...


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I'm assuming you have a reasonable high school education otherwise you probably wouldn't have posted your question. Do a basic science course and/or read - maths, physics, chemistry, biology texts. 1st year university level should be good. If there is anything you don't understand in these texts, go to more basic books - plus Wikipedia is good for the ...


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If you exercise heavily, you can sweat enough where you have to drink to replace it. But on a normal day, you don't sweat all that much. On the other hand, when you metabolize food, you essentially burn it. According to the Merck Manual, Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats supply 90% of the dry weight of the diet and 100% of its energy. All three provide ...


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I just wanted to tackle the interesting numbers here. So there are roughly 10^13 human cells in our body, and 10^14 bacterial. That is where your 90% bacteria number comes from. But remember that bacterial cells are much, much smaller than human cells. E. coli ranges from 0.5um to 2um. Human cells are ~100X larger at 0.1mm or 100um. That translates to:...


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