29

TL;DR I'd recommend Population Genetics: A Concise Guide (Gillespie) for an introduction to population/evolutionary genetics. I'd recommend A Biologist's guide to mathematical modelling in evolution and ecology (Otto and Day) if you want to ensure your knowledge in mathematics by learning their application to evolutionary biology. General Entry Books to ...


18

@Remi.b's list is excellent, but it should also include Gillespie's Population Genetics: A Concise Guide.


15

I found the Campbell Biology textbook to be quite comprehensive and approachable. I think many introductory biology courses use it. http://www.amazon.com/Campbell-Biology-Edition-Jane-Reece/dp/0321558235


9

As you said, the question is pretty broad. Genetics is a big gigantic field and it is quite hard to know what you are exactly looking for. If you could refine into one of the subfields (molecular genetics, population genetics, phylogenetics, etc..) it would be much easier to give you better advice. As you talk about both biology and bioinformatics, it might ...


8

The stinging hairs (trichomes) of the common North American nettle (Urtica dioica) are sharp, pointed cells. These nucleated cells are embedded in a base of smaller epidermal cells. The shaft of the trichome is composed of silica. Upon touch, the tip breaks off, leaving a sharp tip similar to a hypodermic needle. The hollow trichome penetrates the skin, and ...


8

You may want to try A History of Molecular Biology by Michel Morange, it is currently in its third edition, It will not cover everything (proteins are discovered much earlier), you are asking for a wide swath of biology, but it should get you started. The Eighth Day of Creation: Makers of the Revolution in Biology is also a good read. It is also funny to ...


7

There are tons of books and it is quite hard to find one that gives such a broad overview. Campbell Biology is a book that basically covered the first year of my Bachelor degree in biology. I am not sure it would be very stimulating though! If there is a specific branch of biology that interests you, let us know we'll be able to give you a better advice. As ...


7

You either want a introductory book in evolutionary biology or a book that offers mathematical models of evolutionary processes. In my first class of evolutionary biology I had this textbook: Futuyama, Evolution I think it gives a good start to the field and offers a good overview of the difference subfields. If you think you already know enough about the ...


7

Welcome to Biology.SE! I am not aware of any book that talks extensively about the evolution of dominance. It is a very interesting field of research. You can probably search for papers on the subject that will go much further than my below answer. For example, you may want to read Mayo and Burger (1996), Bourguet (1999) and Billiard and Castric (2011) I ...


7

I wanted to comment because I don't think my answer will be the best, but I can't because of my low reputation... Anyway, here are two suggestions: Plant Physiology and Development, by Lincoln Taiz, Eduardo Zeiger & al. Biochemistry and molecular biology of plants, edited by Bob B. Buchanan, Wilhelm Gruissem and Russell L.Jones These are the two main ...


6

I am surprised Janeway's Immunobiology is not listed here: Murphy K. Janeway's Immunobiology. 8th ed. New York: Garland Science; 2011. It is very comprehensive, accessible and goes beyond any graduate course I know. Most immunology researchers I know have a copy of this handy somewhere in their office. A particular highlight are the very clear illustration....


6

As @metacompactness said in the comments, the campbell (9th edition) is available and free in pdf online (here). This book is a classic that most undergraduate students know quite well. Online resources There are some very good online resources to get an introduction to biology. I think that online resources might have the drawback that they may miss the ...


6

I can highly recommend Kandel's "Principles of neural science". I have not had any biology courses since highschool, but I was able to understand it well. It is really a book meant to teach. The style is beginner friendly, and not tedious/boring at all. It is an expensive buy and a very long read (I think the paper version is close to 2000 pages), but ...


6

Unix and Perl to the Rescue by Keith Bradnam and Ian Korf is an excellent introductory book and guide for bioinformatics (Linux and Perl) in genomics. It includes exercises and starts with the very fundamentals. You will still need some basic understanding of genetics and biology though.


6

The books you have The books you cited won't help you to get a solid and general basic knowledge in biology. I haven't read those books but I think that This is Biology is a book of philosophy of biology written by a biologist and philosopher. What is life is a very influential book written by a physicist who more or less predicted the structure of DNA that ...


6

A classic standard textbook that I've used a lot myself (earlier editions) is Begon, Harper & Townsend. This book is very broad and comprehensive, but I know that some students dislike it's back-and-forth discussion style (fewer definite answers). I see this as a strength though. Another good choice, that is much shorter, is Gotelli's A Primer of ...


6

As user @Tyto alba said, the stream you are telling about, is called plant physiology; so you would need some plant physiology textbook. For a general account on all aspects of plant physiology, and where the plant metabolisms are specialized than from animal metabolism; a very good book is Plant physiology by Lincoln Taiz and Eduardo Zeiger, Sinauer ...


5

You should check out Richard Dawkins' book The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution It does focus heavily on evolution but it is an amazing book on biology in general. He covers a wide rage of other topics, from how birds flock so elegantly to dating fossils using dendrochronology. The chapter on embryology is fascinating.


5

What you are describing usually falls under the category of computational biology or just mathematical biology. Unfortunately, the biggest part of this field is bioinformatics, or the application of statistical and/or dynamical programming techniques to sequence data. You exclude this in your question, and I would agree with you that it is a "boring" topic ...


5

I would recommend The selfish gene by Richard Dawkins. It is targeted at a scientifically interested audience, but well written and recognized by the scientific community. http://amzn.com/0199291152


5

Not relatively short, but I'm going to repeat a recommendation I just made in another thread. Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory by Alan Templeton covers many of the topics listed above, and is heavy on the self-learning of various population structure statistics, with examples. It is an introductory textbook with for people with some ...


5

I personally like the Primer on Population Biology by Wilson and Bossert. For a book that is almost 45 years old, it holds up pretty well. One of the best things about this book is that they provide examples and then walk through the solutions step by step. Once in a while it gets a bit too mathematical for this Biologist, but overall, I find it readable and ...


5

Probably the best source to start would be Ilkka Hanksi's work, you can find a full list here: http://www.helsinki.fi/science/metapop/People/IlkkaPub2.htm. The seminal work would be "Ecology, Genetics and Evolution of Metapopulations" It gives a strong mathematical treatment


5

Where I studied, every undergrad read Campbell Biology. You can start it as a non-specialist but you will not be one at the end..


5

Molecular Cloning is updated and in its 4th edition. Every lab used to have it. Its comprehensive, but really no book could be complete.


5

Mold can grow in Extreme environments: they can live in very low water activity level, sometimes as lower as 0.71, live in refrigerator temperatures, these characteristics make it difficult to kill them thoroughly. You can search "paper deterioration" in Google or library, then you can find lots article about this. 1) Causes Foxing and other white, fluffy ...


5

Beginning Perl for Bioinformatics by Jim Tisdall http://shop.oreilly.com is quite good, in my opinion, and his sequel, Mastering Perl for Bioinformatics is also great. The focus is largely, but not exclusively genomics.


5

At least online, I think the single best introductory evolution resource is the Evolution 101 tutorial at UC Berkeley's Understanding Evolution project. The site has been designed by some of the top evolutionary biologists and evolution educators in the country, and does a very good job presenting a basic overview of how evolution works.


5

I work at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, one of the world's largest genomics centres. We do maintain a website for the public wanting to learn about genomics, but it might be a bit basic for you: YourGenome.org You can get into this field without going through grad school: learn at least one programming language (Python is probably the key one today; ...


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