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45

There are at least two separate answers to your question. First, with respect to plants needing CO2, they have evolved to deal with the limited amounts of CO2 normally in the atmosphere. That's really all they need, or "want": adding more doesn't really benefit them. Think of it this way: you need water to live, right? And drink a certain amount of it ...


36

Exhaust gasses from combustion contain many compounds in addition to CO2. Some of them under the right circumstances‡ can be of limited benefit to some plants, but others such as ozone are damaging to all forms of life. Other compounds in vehicle exhaust that are known to cause damage to plants are oxides of sulfur and nitrogen — these react with water to ...


18

The big difference is that in humans, there is no mitosis in the haploid phase. There are three terms that are important here: Haplontic: Most of the life is spent in the haploid phase Diplontic: Most of the life is spent in the diploid phase Haplodiplontic (aka. diplohaplontic): About as much time is spent in the haploid phase than in the diploid phase ...


14

Firstly, I don't think it's entirely clear whether the entire premise of the question is correct. I couldn't find any evidence to suggest that plants don't thrive on highways and areas with lots of cars. If anyone has any data on this, I'd be interested in reading it. Some of the answers here seem to be a bit light on evidence. Let's look at some data on ...


12

Back in the early days of climate science, there were some scientists who considered the possibility that increased CO2 production would lead to increased plant growth, and that this in turn would result in keeping the oxygen-carbon dioxide balance more or less stable. This was referred to as the "Gaia hypothesis" and basically revolved around viewing the ...


11

The seed pods reminded me of the Apocynaceae, so I searched for "apocynaceae china" and found this University of Hawaii page where it is identified as Stemmadenia litoralis. However, a little more looking it seems Tabernaemontana litoralis may be the preferred name. There is some debate here. This book may hold the final answer regarding the genus. Your ...


11

Based on the distinctive leaf shape and placement of the fruit along the stem that appears to be a papaya. If so then the plant should "bleed" latex (a milky white fluid) when damaged. You can test this by breaking off a small piece leaf. Image credit: By Max.kit - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54547062


10

No. Evidence: If you go to the TreeGenes site and examine those tree genomes that have been sequenced you won’t find any fungal chromosome sequences. (And vice versa.) Reason: Although trees and mushrooms may develop symbiotic relationships they are independently viable (at least the trees), and even two organisms that can only survive in a symbiotic ...


9

It's a type of begonia. With 1800 species in the genus, it's hard to say which it is, but the leaves which seem palmate would place it in the aconitifolia species. Your leaves don't appear to be variegated, and your flower is deeper pink, but it's the same flower species.


9

It seems as if nature should absolutely thrive in the middle of highways and nearby, if they get so much nice carbon dioxide from the cars! In fact, some species of plants are likely to thrive from the excess pollution coming from cars, provided they can tolerate the hotter summers and grow quickly enough to take advantage of the higher CO2 levels. ...


8

Ignoring for a moment the other pollutants emitted from car exhaust, increased CO2 levels are warming the planet, through what is called the "greenhouse effect". Photosynthesis is a set of reactions where CO2, water and sunlight are turned into chemical energy used for plant life. However, these reactions only work well in a narrow temperature range. As ...


7

Based on the location and assuming this isn't a domesticated hazelnut there are two likely hazelnut species. The lack of the distinctive "beak" seen on the Beaked hazelnut means this is most likely an American hazelnut (Corylus americana): The hairs along the young branch are also consistent with this (see for example the Plant Guide from the USDA). Note, ...


7

Short answer Sedges have edges, and they're in different families. See Minnesota Wildflowers for a great summary with images. Long answer Both are in the order Poales, but they are in different families: Grasses = Poaceae (of the graminid clade) Sedges = Cyperaceae (of the [non-monophyletic]1 cypirid lineage) Some anatomical differences: ...


6

Considering how many of them I’ve seen growing on the ground where I live in PA, it’s likely a mock strawberry. The plants grow on runners on the ground and have yellow flowers with five petals that become the fruit. The seeds come off easily when you rub it. They’re safe to eat (wash them and make sure your lawn isn’t treated with chemicals though) but ...


6

It is difficult to say, but it is likely due to disease. Many plant diseases have the effect of convincing plant tissues that they are some other organ than what they actually are, which leads to deformations. I was not able to find anything that looked as dramatic as the image that you show, but there are similar diseases in stone fruits that deform fruit: ...


6

Plant pathogens are not a health hazard to the experimenters. However, they can pose health hazards to plants and cause damage to ecosystem. There are plant biosafety levels: BL1-P up to BL4-P (also sometimes abbreviated as BSL-1P and so on). The four levels have an increasing order of stringency of containment. Containment of plant pathogens (also seeds and ...


6

Actually, water is used in the light-dependent portion of photosynthesis, not the Calvin cycle. The added water efficiency doesn't actually relate to water's involvement in chemical processes of photosynthesis at all. Water is instead lost incidentally through stomata when they're opened to allow CO2 into the leaves (see here for explanation). This CO2 IS ...


6

A symbiotic relationship is entirely unrelated to the genetic origins of the participating organisms. Symbiosis only requires that the organisms interact in a manner that benefits both parties. There is nothing that requires any genetic similarity between symbiotic organisms. You may happen to find that particular species of trees and mushrooms do indeed ...


6

This can be a result of a somatic mutation, especially if the other flowers on the same plant don't have the same color pattern. Somatic mutations are not inherited for parent organisms but occur spontaneously in one of the cells in the body. If that cell then proliferates all of its descendants will have the mutation and new phenotype associated with it. ...


5

Retting could be a valid term. But I think that the term "skeletonization" is more common. For instance here is a link to the University of Arizona showing how you would take a flower or a leaf and remove all components, leaving the veins: Skeletonization I think that "retting" is confined to the industrial harvesting of plants like flax. I would use the ...


5

This is a guess, but perhaps the result of an infection by a fungal plant pathogen related to Taphrina deformans. T deformans infects species of the genus Prunus (i.e. the genus of prunes and apricots), but it's best known for causing peach leaf curl in another Prunus species, peaches. For example, see this image of T. deformans infecting a leaf in ...


5

Short answer This type of herbivory is probably from feral livestock, especially donkeys. Long Answer There is video footage of guanacos eating flowers off of cacti in the Atacama. For example, an image capture of a Getty Images video: Credit: BBC Natural History This type of florivory has been documented in related species of cacti as well (e.g., see ...


5

The definition in your first paragraph doesn't match your understanding in the second. If osmotic pressure is high in "A" relative to "B", you would have to apply a physical pressure to "A" to prevent solvent moving from B to A. If there is no such pressure applied, then solvent does move from B to A. The osmotic pressure and physical pressure are separate ...


4

It looks quite similar to the fruit of arbutus unedo (a.k.a. strawberry tree), which is edible: But your image is too low definition to be certain.


4

Even if we restrict ourselves to Morus rubra, the native species, versus Morus alba, the species introduced from China, and ignore possible hybrids, I think you may have to wait for the trees to be larger for an ID. I found a relevant paper (Nepal, M.P., M.H. Mayfield, C.J. Ferguson. 2012. "Identification of eastern North American Morus (Moraceae): ...


4

This review (from 2011)1 states that it depends on the plant species and cultivar. Some continuous light (CL)-grown photosynthetic organisms show increased productivity. However, CL also induces negative effects in several plant species. The most visible CL-induced negative effects are leaf chlorosis and necrosis. CL also lowers photosynthetic ...


4

One way* to come up with an estimate of how many leaves - or needles, in the case of Sequoiadendron giganteum - is simply to count the number of leaves on a twig (or a number, to get a good average), then the number of twigs on a branch, and then count the branches on the tree, after which it's just multiplication. Now one reason that the number seems so ...


4

Perfect flowers have both male and female parts. "Degraded" isn't used anymore - just "imperfect". "A bisexual (or “perfect”) flower has both stamens and carpels, and a unisexual (or “imperfect”) flower either lacks stamens (and is called carpellate) or lacks carpels (and is called staminate). Species with both staminate flowers and carpellate flowers on ...


3

That looks like it is probably a single leaf coming up from a tuber. That fact combined with the mottled pattern on the petiole (leaf stalk) and the shape and branching pattern of the leaflets makes me guess it was something in the genus Amorphophallus. Example image: Other images for the "voodoo lily".


3

This is not a sundew. A simple Google search can confirm that.


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