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Why plants evolve to flower at various times depends on several factors. I've taken these from the book chapter Kudo 2006. 1) Climate and other abiotic conditions. Spring, and the onset of consistent above freezing temperatures, is the first opportunity for many plants to flower, but it may not be ideal for all. For example some locations are still very dry ...


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It appears to be a cultivar of Jujube (Ziziphus zizyphus) also known as Chinese date - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube This is based on JimN's correct observation. I looked at a few dozen images of Ziziphus Zizyphus - both fruit and leaves. They appear to be identical. The fruit tastes as described. The fruiting progression matches the description in ...


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The third photo gets to the heart of the matter. Here's an enlargement: The gold-colored areas are the anthers of some of the stamens, the filaments of which are fused with the tissue of the petal. (This is typical of the Apocynaceae, the family to which A. blanchetti belongs; they have epipetalous stamens, that is the stamens are "adnate" i.e. ...


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There are numerous visual indicators for various type of plants that determine plant health. For example the rigidity of the leaves can help you determine that enough water is supplied to the plant (1). Now you can also determine the leaf shape and detect for presence of disease (2), pests (3), and plant health in general (4). This research however mentions ...


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As far as the ID goes, this looks like Allamanda blanchetti. See this question.


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Rose species reproduce perfectly well in nature, by the normal means of seeds and suckering. For instance, Rosa woodsii is found growing along streams throughout the western US: https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=rowo The reason rose (and other plant) VARIETIES are propagated by various artificial means is primaily because they are ...


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