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The heat the plant produces ultimately comes from the light it uses. Unless the plant produces heat just in the wanted time (winter?) from light absorbed another time; then you would be just as warm by letting the light directly warm your environment regardless of plants.


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Philodendron bipinnatifidum is a thermogenic houseplant. It is somewhat toxic, so not pet- or small-child-friendly, but commonly grown as a houseplant. However, I do not know if the heat generated would be enough to significantly impact your house; my impression is that most thermogenic plants merely warm their immediate surroundings (so you may need a LOT ...


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Not all plant cells perform a function when they die. But a lot do. Sclerenchyma is refereed to as: Sclerenchyma is the tissue which makes the plant hard and stiff... Mature sclerenchyma is composed of dead cells with extremely thick cell walls (secondary walls). Plant cell death includes necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy and studying how and why they ...


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They are common hollyhocks, they come in many colors. As a little kid from Chicago , I was impressed by flowers taller than me when visiting rural Wisconsin . Then the standard for hiding/decoration outhouses.


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the Genus Cuscuta has over 200 species varying in color from yellow, to orange, and purple (sometimes but rarely can also be green). The organism in the photo is not likely to be a subspecies of the usual dodders you find in your area, instead it is likely to be a different species entirely (while still belonging to the same genus). The rope dodder (Cuscuta ...


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For California trees, my go-to is A Californian's Guide to the Trees Among Us by Matt Ritter (Heyday, 2011). California trees can be challenging due to the extremely varied habitat and many introductions over the years. Your trees appear to be younger specimens of Pinus pinea or the Italian Stone Pine, based on the description on page 14 in Ritter. No other ...


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The hairy stem and leaf pattern remind me of elms. Wikipedia has an example of american elm seedlings which look quite similar to what you have to me:


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Re: Bryan Krause's comment, measurements per hectare are common. However, if you can just estimate average trees per hectare, then it works out. But it still likely depends on the local climate, ecology etc. It also varies across the life term of the tree. Some estimates have been made, such as in this paper (see Table 4), for Quercus rubra and 2 other ...


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One of the properties of "storoge" is that in can be filled or empied when needed. Contents of cytoplasm and all organelles are aqueous solutions so all of them contain quite some water. However, thease solutions need to maintain precise concentration of many solutes in order to facilitate proper enviroment for various biological processes. ...


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The cytoplasm of the cell is 80% water$^1$. All organelles contain water because all enzymatic activities inside the cell require water. However vacuoles are generally said to store water because they generally make up 30% to 80%$^2$ of the plant cell. Thus the cytoplasm, vacuole and all other organelles contain water and contribute to the cells water ...


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The plant is Convolvulus tricolor, the dwarf morning-glory. It belongs to the family Convolvulaceae.Blue, white, red and pink flowering cultivars of this plant are available$^1$. It is a annual/perennial growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in) at a medium rate$^2$. Image source References: Plantasm PFAF database


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Common names It is known as pepper elder, silverbush, rat-ear, man-to-man, clearweed (North America); prenetaria (Puerto Rico); konsaka wiwiri (Suriname); coraçãozinho or "little heart" (Brazil); lingua de sapo, herva-de-vidro, herva-de-jaboti or herva-de-jabuti (South America), ewe rinrin (Yoruba Nigeria), corazón de hombre (Cuba).[11] In Oceania, ...


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The tree is most likely sick. Plant diseases take years to develop versus diseases in animals caused by either bacteria, viruses, or parasites. This is because the tree has thick cell walls that can be a huge barrier hindering viral infection. Another thing is that trees lack a circulatory system and rely on partial water pressure from the air to draw water ...


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