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1

I think this is Ribes americanum or wild black currant. I'm basing this on page 306 of Newcomb's Wildflower Guide, an excellent source for the Eastern US and some of Canada. On that page we have two main choices: 1. Base of flowers prickly or bristly... or 2. Base of flowers not prickly or bristly... Your excellent pictures suggest that your specimen is in ...


0

It's to do with the chemistry taking place in the system, and then in turn the balance of energy resources. Leaves contain chlorophyll, a molecule that traps light energy. It is large molecule containing a long carbon chain and a magnesium atom surrounded by 4 nitrogen atoms. In terms of a plants energy resources it is an 'expensive' molecule, but it is ...


2

It looks like a white crab apple or an obscure cultivar of apples, of which there are many. The best identifier will be the fruit. Because there are not millions of flowers, It looks like there may be less fruit and bigger than a crab apple, although it varies by year. The fruit of crab apples are small apples which can be used to make jelly. Crab apple ...


1

The tree grew its first fruits this spring, so that I could definitely identify it: it is a goat willow! This is consistent with its spontaneous sprouting in my yard, as it is a common tree in my region.


0

No. Consider an original population that produces pollen over a fairly long time, and then something happens to select earlier & later times for different populations. This is actually quite common for domestic plants such as fruit trees, where different varieties are selected (by humans) to produce fruit at different times. As far as the question ...


5

This phenomena has elements of what, in the UK, are termed Phoenix Trees, however this term, and the term Phoenix Regeneration, is more often used when describing characteristics of ancient and veteran trees. The principles that underlie what the photo shows is that new growth on trees will always grow strongest where there is the most light available, and ...


1

Speaking specifically about blueberry bushes as a perhaps extreme example, they thrive in acidic soil and nitrogen-laden soil. However, dog urine is bad for blueberries, as the high nitrogen content overwhelms the plant and damages fruit production. Dog urine is only slightly acidic (pH 6-6.5) and can often be alkaline, which also changes the soil acidity in ...


1

This shrub is called Tradescantia pallida. You can read more about this shrub on this website https://florafaunaweb.nparks.gov.sg/Special-Pages/plant-detail.aspx?id=2521 I hope this helps you


2

This is a bit hard to say exactly, since there is a number of possibilities. We can be pretty sure that these sample is from a Cypress, belonging to the family of Cupressaceae, but which subfamily or species this is exactly, can't be identified here. Therefore a wider image would be necessary, but since this is a potted plant, even this might not be enough, ...


3

This (lovely) succulent is Crassula ovata variety "Gollum", known also as "gollum jade" or "finger jade". Search for the name and you'll find lots of commercial sources. One informative source is here.


3

This is common sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides. The blueish leaves and the orange berries are unmistakable. It occurs mainly in coastal regions, but is also cultivated throughout the world. The berries are processed to all kinds of food. In their natural habitat in Northwestern Europe, the berries serve as a food source for migrating birds that fly from ...


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