New answers tagged

2

Short answer: Many of the evolutionary developments in plants developed in the sporophyte life stage. Because increased fitness of these increasingly sporophyte-"dominant" plants would result in a greater survival and reproductive success, these plants became more dominant than the more-limited gametophyte-dominant early plants. In other words, natural ...


1

This is an example of "bouquet ears", or, what Rob Nielsen coined in his 1999 paper2 as "MESS Syndrome" (Multiple Ears on Same Shank). Although not a regular occurrence, MESS syndrome is not unusual. According to Nielson in an online article in 2014 [my emphasis included]: The fact that multiple ears sometimes develop from a single ear shank is not, in ...


2

Based on the habitat, color, and size that lupine looks like Coastal bush lupine (Lupinus arboreus). Please note that Coastal bush lupine can be invasive, so be responsible about where you plant it! You can also learn more about this plant and its growth requirements from the California Native Plant Society Images for comparison:


2

Short answer This type of herbivory is probably from feral livestock, especially donkeys. Long Answer There is video footage of guanacos eating flowers off of cacti in the Atacama. For example, an image capture of a Getty Images video: Credit: BBC Natural History This type of florivory has been documented in related species of cacti as well (e.g., ...


1

I'm going to take a stab at this. If your plant is not particularly aromatic, I feel pretty confident it is Lycopus uniflorus. There are good descriptions here and here. In particular, the description of the flowers at the Minnesota site, as having 2 purple-stemmed exserted stamens seems to match your flowers. Apparently this species should have a tuber (...


0

The best reading for the topic is "a comparison of chirality patterns of climbing plants in Peru and Brazil" from "assymetry in plants" which sais that: The mechanical or physiological basis for dextral versus sinistral orientation of circumnutation among apically twining plants has not been determined, despite several papers on the topic in recent years ((...


0

So, this discussion began several years ago now. I recently decided to grow up, more than out, to conserve space. So, I've tried climbers more. When I had several different plants growing, I noticed they all climbed clockwise. If the original author still lives in Australia, I propose an experiment. I live in the Northern Hemisphere, just outside ...


1

Okay so simple solution I saw the owner of the plant out and just asked what it was. She said it was a Konnyaku Potato (Amorphophallus konjac 'Nightstick'). You can see the branching shoot at the bottom, similar colors, and similar leaves.


5

This is a guess, but perhaps the result of an infection by a fungal plant pathogen related to Taphrina deformans. T deformans infects species of the genus Prunus (i.e. the genus of prunes and apricots), but it's best known for causing peach leaf curl in another Prunus species, peaches. For example, see this image of T. deformans infecting a leaf in ...


5

Retting could be a valid term. But I think that the term "skeletonization" is more common. For instance here is a link to the University of Arizona showing how you would take a flower or a leaf and remove all components, leaving the veins: Skeletonization I think that "retting" is confined to the industrial harvesting of plants like flax. I would use the ...


3

That looks like it is probably a single leaf coming up from a tuber. That fact combined with the mottled pattern on the petiole (leaf stalk) and the shape and branching pattern of the leaflets makes me guess it was something in the genus Amorphophallus. Example image: Other images for the "voodoo lily".


1

A botanist at a local university says it is most definitely Crown Gall. He didn't provide any other information than that, so all I can do is quote Wikipedia: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (updated scientific name Rhizobium radiobacter, synonym Agrobacterium radiobacter) is the causal agent of crown gall disease (the formation of tumours) in over 140 ...


6

It is difficult to say, but it is likely due to disease. Many plant diseases have the effect of convincing plant tissues that they are some other organ than what they actually are, which leads to deformations. I was not able to find anything that looked as dramatic as the image that you show, but there are similar diseases in stone fruits that deform fruit: ...


1

If you want mitotic chromosomes then you want to look at apical meristems — probably the primary root from germinating seedlings will be easiest. Apical meristems are at the growing tips of roots (and shoots) and contain regions of rapidly dividing cells. Since you can only see chromosomes as separate bodies when they are condensed for cell division this ...


2

Herrera, Sara et al. 2018 suggest that there are at least 33 S-alleles in apricot. I believe some species of Brassica have at least 60 S-alleles identified. However, there are dominance relationships among these alleles, so I don't think you can directly extrapolate from the number alleles to to the rate at which non-self pollen will be excluded. The ...


2

... pine needles? These are the leaves of coniferous (evergreen) trees. It sounds like they might be from Pinus ponderosa, a species of pine.


1

I have heard the process that leads to this called retting.


17

The big difference is that in humans, there is no mitosis in the haploid phase. There are three terms that are important here: Haplontic: Most of the life is spent in the haploid phase Diplontic: Most of the life is spent in the diploid phase Haplodiplontic (aka. diplohaplontic): About as much time is spent in the haploid phase than in the diploid phase ...


0

Looks like the common olive, Olea europea. Cut into one of the fruits and see if there is a stone/pit, which will confirm. You can search online for images to compare (use the Latin name as your search term).


Top 50 recent answers are included