New answers tagged

1

All the bell peppers and chilli peppers and jalapeno's and cayenne peppers are the same species, Capsicum annuum. The bell pepper was developed in the 1920's from a hotter variety. Here are photos of the wild varieties: https://www.fataliiseeds.net/product-category/wild_chiles/ They are berries. All the american plants like tomatos and potatoes are all from ...


1

There are a number of incorrect assumptions here, including the basic premise of your question: bats absolutely do not spread COVID-19. This is a misunderstanding that has unfortunately gained a lot of traction amid the pandemic hysteria, and one that only serves to deepen the public's mistrust of bats and encourage people to harm or kill wildlife that pose ...


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"Why haven't we already tested positive for a long time?" "Since it's known that bats spread Covid 19". Apparently, your hypothesis and assumptions are wrong. To prove your hypothesis, you may analyze honey samples for Covid-19 and other corona viruses.


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I would argue that for rice at least, it's very important to consider economic dimensions of the problem. Rice cultivation has a long tradition, by which we know it requires a huge water and light supply. Therefore, it‘s really expensive to have a 3D „vertical farming“ approach for cheap stuff like rice. They [who?] are trying to develop rice which ...


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Just received an answer from Armenia. It is Hypericum perforatum https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypericum_perforatum


2

To answer this question, first, we must define the terms. Major primary plant organs can be characterized as either roots, stems, or leaves. A stem is a structure that contains nodes and internodes (as a previous answer explains), and axillary buds. These buds mean that stems can give rise to more stems, roots, or leaves. Branches can be defined as stems ...


1

I think that the potential survival of your seedlings could more likely be credited to your care and management than random genetic mutations. While, of course, DNA mutations happen during cell replication, evolution at the whole-plant scale primarily occurs over the course of generations, not the lifespan of a single plant. You may well be able to get these ...


0

The link that @tyersome mentioned in the comment does a great job of answering your question. In the event that you read it and still have some confusion, here is a metaphor: imagine guard cells as two modeling balloons (the long kind that clowns use to make figurines) that are slightly inflated and attached together at both ends. Since they are only ...


3

This is a really interesting question! It gets to the heart of how photosynthesis works. First, note that whether or not the plant will immediately start producing glucose depends on a variety of factors (what type of plant, what type of light). For example, many succulents undergo CAM photosynthesis (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism) in which light capture ...


1

Independent of the hormone manipulation suggested by Alex Reynolds, perturbation of transcription factor UPB1 has been found to have an effect on plant growth by Tsukagoshi and colleagues -- Transcriptional regulation of ROS controls transition from proliferation to differentiation in the root. In short, disrupting UPB1 activity in model Arabidopsis roots ...


3

Perhaps investigate the families of YUC genes that synthesize the growth hormone auxin (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941117) and ARF genes (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4737911) that respond to auxin. Auxin overproduction or changes to ARFs might speed growth. But some herbicides are synthetic auxins (e.g. 2,4-D) and work by exhausting and killing ...


4

Perfect flowers have both male and female parts. "Degraded" isn't used anymore - just "imperfect". "A bisexual (or “perfect”) flower has both stamens and carpels, and a unisexual (or “imperfect”) flower either lacks stamens (and is called carpellate) or lacks carpels (and is called staminate). Species with both staminate flowers and carpellate flowers on ...


0

In the same wikipedia page of spores you cited, you can find that they have said: Fungi commonly produce spores, as a result of sexual, or asexual, reproduction. Spores are usually haploid.. Again, Vascular plant spores are always haploid. So, sexual and asexual spores have no difference in ploidy- both are haploid. (There are exceptions- zygospores ...


1

'Stalk' or 'pedicel' would be an appropriate term (see, for example, this paper or this one). Specifically, you could say 'terminal part of the stalk/pedicel', though I don't know if there is a word for that. Note that the term pedicel is commonly used for the stalk of a flower; it makes sense to use it for fruits too as they are derived from flowers.


7

Short answer Sedges have edges, and they're in different families. See Minnesota Wildflowers for a great summary with images. Long answer Both are in the order Poales, but they are in different families: Grasses = Poaceae (of the graminid clade) Sedges = Cyperaceae (of the [non-monophyletic]1 cypirid lineage) Some anatomical differences: ...


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We found the following link when search on the quote, the information is cited there: http://gibneyce.com/tree-stats---classics.html Cristina Hubbard, Executive Director Forest Web


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The term "Branch" used in school textbooks generally mean stem branch and the stem branches are stem in morphological identity because they have nodes, internodes, leaves, and exogenous development.


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Antifungal properties? as tested in below article. López‐García, B., Hernández, M. and Segundo, B.S., 2012. Bromelain, a cysteine protease from pineapple (Ananas comosus) stem, is an inhibitor of fungal plant pathogens. Letters in applied microbiology, 55(1), pp.62-67. Available here


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