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By reasoning, we can make the following distinction: the trigeminal nerve is a cranial nerve. the 2 others are peripheral nerves. Cranial nerves take their origin into their respective nuclei, and bypass the dorsal columns (main spinal tract for sensory information). Peripheral sensory nerves stem from the spinal roots, and from there go up through the ...


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Short answer The thalamus is the most important neural station for the filtering of peripheral information to the cerebral cortex. Background Sleep is a prime example of where much, if not all, of the peripheral input ascending to the brain is filtered out. The thalamus situated in the brain stem is the major gateway for the flow of information toward the ...


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A neuron cannot know the importance of a signal in any applied sense, that is, it can't know the difference between one triggered by a feather or one by a hammer... on an individual basis. A single neuron can however accumulate information in a number of ways, either by requiring multiple incoming triggers (filtering out localised signals, i.e. from a ...


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It obviously can do that, causing a rubella encephalitis. A specialized form seems to be the "Progressive rubella panencephalitis", which is very rare with only 20 cases described since its first description in 1974. About rubella encephalitis more papers are available, see these for a start: Neurological aspects of rubella virus infection. Mumps ...


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The minimal neural mechanisms that are jointly sufficient for consciousness (conscious percept, thought, memory, etc.) to occur, under constant background conditions, are called the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) [1]. The background conditions are enabling factors that must be present for the NCC to be able to function (e.g., the heart must beat ...


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Nerves (including cranial nerves) are constituted of neurons, and other supporting cells and structures (e.g. myelin sheath and extracellular protein matrix). Neurons are highly specialized cells that have a particular cellular anatomy: As you can see, the cell body (or soma) contains the nucleus, and projects it's axon towards other structures in the ...


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The key player you are lacking is the thalamus, which integrates a lot of stimuli, and pre-processes them before sending them to the cortex


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