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I think you have misconceived what a brain actually means. A brain is an organ, which is very different from the organelles of microorganisms. Organ: a collection of cells that carry out a specific function. Organelle: a structure enclosed in a membranne that exists in the cytoplasm of a cell. The brain is a collection of neurons, of sometimes just cells ...


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Neuroregeneration capability is rather limited, and patients that go through the trauma that you speak of usually require life-long assistance[1]. One treatment that has come to light in the past two years uses stem cell delivery to the brain[2]. When a cell dies, if it is replaced, there are stem cells that do it (google mesenchymal or skin stem cells and ...


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There is a lot of debate over what "thoughts" are in terms of consciousness, and this has been referred to as the "hard problem". However, it seems pretty clear that in some form patterns of brain activity are the "stuff" that underlies a thought/idea: if you change patterns of brain activity, you change the thought. Therefore, ...


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Single cells do not have brains. Plenty of multicellular organisms do not have brains either. Multicellular organisms such as fungi, plants, sponges do not even have nervous systems, and many organisms with nervous systems (like some jellyfish, molluscs, arthropods...) do not have something you could call a brain (I mean, I guess arthropods have a brain in ...


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Walking is about more than having strong legs moving in a hinge motion. It's about coordinating all your leg muscles and your torso muscles. Babies have instincts which tell them how to coordinate all the muscle movements for suckling, but they still have to practice all the muscle movements for eating (and again, while learning to coordinate all the torso ...


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Biological neurons function in a very different way, as compared to the simplistic artificial neural networks of machine learning. For example, see how real neurons work and how they connect with each other. The types of neurons themselves are very varied: "...neurons to take specialized forms such as unipolar,bipolar, multipolar, anaxonic, ...


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Some babies start walking by 12-15 months, so it's not exactly years before they can do it. They can also grasp things with their hands from birth. When first born they still don't have full ocular control, and especially can't focus except on strongly contrasting objects. If you watch a newborn, their eyes are often moving from place to place, even when a ...


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Evolution set us humans up to not regenerate our neurons on the whole, which is a pity since we can regenerate our liver cells, so it's not an impossible feat. If neurons die because you drank too much, banged your head, or just because they got old, they are gone. If this death is accelerated like in Alzheimer's disease, you can literally see holes in the ...


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Disclaimer: I'm not an expert, but my recent reading on this topic is fresh in memory, so I'm typing up something of an answer. The body does not remake any individual cells that die. In case of cells that regenerate, their place is simply occupied by cells which are newly born, or travel from elsewhere. Every individual cell is unique, with its own copy of ...


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Yes, this is a very basic neuroscience question, something that would probably come up in the first week of a neurophysiology class or unit. The polarization of the membrane at rest is due to cells being primarily permeable to potassium at rest, and due to a concentration difference of potassium inside vs. outside the membrane. Inside, potassium is high, ...


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