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There is at least one (possible) description of an inherited (aka germline) fusion gene: KANSARL. See the paper "Identification of KANSARL as the first cancer predisposition fusion gene specific to the population of European ancestry origin" by Zhou, Yang, Ning et al., Oncotarget. 2017; 8:50594-50607. KANSARL fusion gene is familially inherited and may ...


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The terminology of "Rb is active/inactive" refers to the activity of inhibiting E2F. So active Rb inhibits E2F, while inactive Rb doesn't inhibit E2F. With regard to Rb and phosphorylation - the story seems to be more complex ([1] describes Rb as an enigma). According to [2] (this quote is from the summary of the paper by eLife): Narasimha, Kaulich, ...


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The first source (Science Direct) says that the "vaccine" treatment stimulates T cells to attack cancer. In general, this treatment is intended for all tumors and has been very successful in studies in mice. Cancer.net and Cancerresearchuk describe cancer treatment vaccines in a bit more detail. The second source (Telegraph.co.uk) mentions “tumor agnostic” ...


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I encountered the following paragraph in the textbook Life: The Science of Biology: Some chemicals add groups to the bases. For instance, benzopyrene, a component of cigarette smoke, adds a large chemical group to guanine, making it unavailable for base pairing. When DNA polymerase reaches such a modified guanine, it inserts any one of the four ...


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This is a good question. The first answer is that there are antibody therapeutics for cancer. These fall into two categories which I will call therapeutic and immunotherapy (this is not typical naming but, keeping it simple they will do). Therapeutic antibodies are designed to bind to an enzyme or signalling protein that will weaken the tumor ...


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