8

There is not enough information in the question to solve it. The answer key from the original question makes a logical error: Viscosity is directly proportional to resistance. This is true. An increase in viscosity increases resistance. Flow and pressure do not matter for this statement to be true. You are correct to assume an increase in resistance. ...


5

Actually it can. See https://clinicalhypertension.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40885-016-0052-y for instance: Deleterious effects of HRE [hypertensive response to exercise] on structure and function of left ventricle (LV) has been reported consistently. Theoretically, individuals with HRE would be exposed to abnormally high pressure loads to left ...


5

By convention, positive current is assumed to be the direction of flow of positive charges. The trouble is that in many common situations (like this one), the current is actually carried by electrons which are negatively charged. It can be confusing. Blame it on Benjamin Franklin. The convention for current flow was based on his work, before anyone knew ...


3

I'm not a physician, but I suspect the popliteal artery may not have been the vessel used. The popliteal artery has a very important role in supplying the leg with blood, and maintaining the blood supply from it to the lower (distal) leg is sometimes reason for harvesting other vessels. You described a very long cut, which sounds like what you would see for ...


3

You've misread the linked article if you take this to mean there is some place that is unaffected by cardiac activity. It's just that there must be some place that is equal in pressure to the MCFP. The actual position fluctuates throughout the cardiac cycle. The reason, though, that some place must be equal to MCFP is that pressure is continuous. Somewhere ...


3

It comes down to the distinction between velocity and flow rate. While you are right that the water would leave a an increased velocity if you put your thumb over the end of the hose, this is deceptive, because the water is exiting the closed system, so it can go absolutely anywhere. So the fact that the velocity is increased could give one the impression ...


1

The GHK voltage equation also known as just "Goldman equation" is always valid for determining the voltage at which the net current is zero, given internal/external ion concentrations and their permeabilities. This includes times during the action potential, though the result you get from GHK will be changing faster than the actual membrane ...


1

From personal experience, extracting organs/tissues of over 1000 mice I can give some hints: Mice blood coagulates quite fast after death. If you need to extract blood, you are under time-pressure and many scientists extract the blood directly after death from the heart using a syringe. If you are not fast, you miss the chance of drawing blood as this can't ...


1

At a constant volumetric flow-rate, the product of velocity and vesicle cross-section area is constant. In a real-life scenario, the volumetric flow-rate decreases when you hold your finger over the opening. So while water exits 'faster', at higher velocity, you would fill less bottles of water per minute.


1

The key is vascular resistance. Pumps like the heart don't move fluid, they exert force ("push") on it, increasing the pressure. The movement happens subsequently because there is somewhere for the fluid to go, so it moves down the pressure gradient from a place of high pressure to a place of lower pressure. If you clamped their outputs (increased ...


1

The reason massaging the carotid artery can relieve symptoms of supraventricular tachycardia is because by massaging the artery, as you point our yourself, you artificially increase BP within the carotid artery, this activates a reflex (via the glossopharyngeal nerve) that lowers bloodpressure by reducing the heart rate via the vagus nerve, by increasing the ...


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