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This question has been directly addressed by the paper The Mechanism of Proton Exclusion in the Aquaporin-1 Water Channel. I think it's a pretty good one too! I paste the abstract below: Aquaporins are efficient, yet strictly selective water channels. Remarkably, proton permeation is fully blocked, in contrast to most other water-filled pores which are ...


11

tl;dr Cells are 3D and the cytoskeleton does not exist within the nucleus. There are several things you have to be aware of when looking at such pictures. Remember, you are looking at a 3D object which is not homogeneous and uniform in depth. Shape of a plated HeLa cells You are looking at HeLa cells. When plated like in your case, they adhere to the plate ...


2

Although specific time is not yet clear, the coronavirus mRNA vaccine is expected to be degraded within hours after translation, according to Rebecca Dutch, Ph.D., a virologist at the University of Kentucky. "It’s unclear how long this degradation takes. With regular mRNA, it’s within hours. The special coating involved with mRNA coronavirus vaccines ...


2

No and Yes, respectively. No, you don't need to select for and generally you can't unless you use something like FACS to sort and capture cells expressing your marker/GOI. Transient transfections are generally not selected for, if they are it is to make a more stable line, and either requires integration of the marker site into the genome (most common) or in ...


2

If you search the web or Google Scholar, you should be able to find plenty of examples of colocalization protocols. In general, though, for each target you're going to want to have an unstained control sample (you can use one for all targets), a secondary-only sample to look for non-specific background staining, and a single-color sample (primary plus ...


2

It is because you don't know how your treatments affect the expression of the total specific protein; perhaps it down- or up-regulates the amount of protein being made, but the relative proportion of phosphorylation doesn't change. For example: Imagine you have 4 samples from different treatments of which you have loaded an equal amount of total protein (...


1

Generally no, you can't directly compare them and you can't easily compare across gels. I have done many hundreds of western blots, a large proportion of which were for quantitation, and in general quantitation on western blots is difficult (because of inconsistency run to run) and not highly quantitative - a 2-fold change is detectable and probably real, ...


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