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SUIT-2 cell lines are derived from the liver metastases of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. The subline S2-007 is highly metastatic. The other sublines are S2-013, S2-020 and S2-028 which have decreasing metastatic capabilities. You can probably refer these articles for more info : 1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3102439 2. https://link.springer.com/...


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No, absence of an stimulating substance is not appropriate to consider as inhibition. To see why, consider a situation where there are two such substances, substance A and substance B, which can both stimulate protein P (many such relations exist). If you add only substance B, then protein P will be stimulated. Since P is being stimulated in this case, it ...


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Ploidy is generally defined in terms of the number of chromosomes in the nucleus, rather than the number of chromosomes in the cell. Some examples in support of this: - A paramecium has a diploid micronucleus and polyploid macronucleus - Muscle cells are generally considered diploid even though they have multiple nuclei - The additional chromosomes in ...


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How does the mitotic entry machinery roughly respond to cell volume? This is a broad question but luckily there is one article that addresses this precise question in detail. However, it is very likely that more discoveries are made on this topic in future. Neurohr et al. (2019) have extensively studied the effect of cell volume on mitotic re-entry and ...


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The OP might be asking about what is called mirror touch synaesthesia Like all synaesthesia [also spelled synesthesia] this is a new area of research. I have synaesthesia but I don't have this kind. Most researchers study "grapheme synaeshesia" grapheme because that is easier to make into empirical results. Dr Anina Rich studies synaesthesia. She might ...


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There are several enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These some of thse enzymes are encoded in the human genome. You can check out KEGG for a detailed pathway in different organisms. The green arrows denote reactions (and enzymes) that are present in a given organism (Homo sapiens, in this case). If you click on the arrows you can know the ...


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I think you are almost right. DNA (in the nucleus) is transcribed to mRNA, and protein synthesis occurs on ribosomes where the the sequence of bases in the mRNA is translated into protein. Ribosomes are located in the cytoplasm or attached to the endoplasmic reticulum. (The 'mRNA story' is well told in Who discovered mRNA?) But there is also another type of ...


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Was just researching your exact same question. Self-replicate is the closest I could find or think of... but it's a very general verb, not even biology specific. e.g. Please don't self-replicate, I'm already having trouble with just one of you -- said the programmer to his memory gobbling AI program. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-replication


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If you want mitotic chromosomes then you want to look at apical meristems — probably the primary root from germinating seedlings will be easiest. Apical meristems are at the growing tips of roots (and shoots) and contain regions of rapidly dividing cells. Since you can only see chromosomes as separate bodies when they are condensed for cell division this ...


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The terminology of "Rb is active/inactive" refers to the activity of inhibiting E2F. So active Rb inhibits E2F, while inactive Rb doesn't inhibit E2F. With regard to Rb and phosphorylation - the story seems to be more complex ([1] describes Rb as an enigma). According to [2] (this quote is from the summary of the paper by eLife): Narasimha, Kaulich, ...


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