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The presence of an organelle in a cell is strongly connected with its main function. For example in red blood cells, to have maximum space for haemoglobin and hence oxygen storage, many of the organelles are not present such as nucleus, golgi complex, lysosomes, etc. Another example can be of liver cells or muscle cells having a very high amount of ...


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Short answer: Unlike the physical model you're describing above, the reality is that localisation of biomolecules in the cell isn't a passive process, instead molecules are actively concentrated where they're required to be by a variety of different mechanisms. long answer: I think possible 'missing pieces' of this picture which may help you reconcile these ...


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To expand on what others have said beyond mutation rates; many organisms are endoploids so cell genomes are different by sizes within organisms.


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There are two ways to think about the "charge" of a cell. One way is by looking at all the chemical species inside the cell and calculating their sum charge. If you do this, you're going to get a neutral solution up to many decimal points of rounding error. Therefore, we don't really care or bother to do this. You'll get the same for the ...


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Proteins are fairly fragile molecular machines. They are subjected to environmental and intentional degradation all the time. There is quite a bit of variability across different protein types in how long they last, but none are permanent. Chen et al 2016 write: For example, RALB is a GTPase, and is involved in a variety of cellular processes including gene ...


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There is no specific number of dead cells to be honest that serves as the threshold for pain, it is the molecules that are responsible for decreasing or increasing the threshold of pain either peripherally (at the site of nociceptors) or centrally (endogenous opioids). Here is a diagram that kind of summarizes pain pathophysiology at nociceptor level. For ...


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