3

The phrase "high cholesterol", and the measurement itself is a marker for high levels of a particular lipoprotein, Low density lipoprotein (LDL). Because cholesterol and triglycerides are not soluble in plasma, they are packaged by the liver into soluble particles called lipoproteins. Packaged in lipoproteins, these lipids are transported throughout the body,...


3

Original Answer (posted originally as a Comment) It is now accepted that high cholesterol causes atherosclerosis. Cholesterol a major component of the plaques that block arteries. 'Good' and 'bad' cholesterol refer to the way cholesterol is transported in the bloodstream. 'Bad' cholesterol is cholesterol in the form of low density lipoproteins or LDL, and ...


2

What you have asked for is a causal answer to correlated findings. There is no cause-effect evidence (at least from my searching) showing low cholesterol will indeed cause stroke. Associations like this are dangerous in the sense that we shouldn't think that one causes the other. But, we can speculate on how they are linked, which is always fun. I'll be ...


1

The question as stated is unclear as to what is being asked. If the question is whether ingested cholesterol from whatever source is good or bad, then the answer is that dietary cholesterol is superfluous to human nutrition since it can be synthesized by the liver, and the latest guidelines suggest to keep intake as low as possible. While adequate ...


1

Cholesterol certainly affects plasma membrane fluidity. In 1978 Cooper found that increasing the ratio of cholesterol to phospholipids decreased the membrane fluidity. This also reduces membrane permeability and reduces the survival of the cells (red blood cells in that case). I imagine this is where the textbooks draw their conclusions. More recently Rog ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible