3

That graphic is just confusing you. The cell doesn't keep track of all the chromosomes from Mother versus all the chromosomes from Father so it can sort them out later. That I know of! [I don't think imprinting counts because its effect varies between genes] But the paternal and maternal chromosomes are still separate before meiosis - there hasn't been ...


2

When I was learning genetics for the first time I have also found naming the two chromatids joined at centromere as chromosome a little bit strange. The number of DNA molecules and their behaviour in cell cycle seemed to me more important for understanding of genetics. What you need to understand.is the term chromosome predates knowledge of DNA structure. ...


2

The only "complete" monosomy that is survivable in humans is Turner syndrome. So your source is a bit silly. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosomy


2

Imprinting occurs via DNA methylation in gametes. Different parts of the genome are methylated in either eggs or sperm, and this then marks those genes throughout the lifespan of the organism, inherited epigenetically across cell divisions. See: Wood, A. J., & Oakey, R. J. (2006). Genomic imprinting in mammals: emerging themes and established theories. ...


2

It would help a bit to get the exact quote from the text. That definition doesn't seem to agree with what I find when I research the term. For prokaryotes, I find the term here but it is poorly defined and does not agree with what you write. It is described as a "naked" chromosome that is only DNA, but that also doesn't make sense as bacterial ...


1

Like @mgkrebbs commented, the left poster shows a total of 8 chromosomes, but only 4 pairs of chromosomes. I would dare say that you are right and that the poster is wrong. The left has 8 chromosomes, and 4 pairs of chromosomes. The right has 4 chromosomes, and they are not paired up, so the number of pairs is insignificant.


1

Don't assume a chromosome to be some X-shaped box that contains DNA inside it and DNA as a container of genes. DNA, genes, Chromatid, Chromosomes are just different names at different levels of the same thing. In molecular biology, you'll find multiple definitions of certain terms because as new insights are gained by any researcher, the definition gets ...


1

Theoretically anything can happen, but you also have to take into account firstly, the probability of such an incident (which is particularly rare in this case) and secondly, if the creature can survive after or even until birth, to be counted as an organism with that kind of anomaly. For instance, the odds of trisomy 21 taking place in humans is not much ...


1

There are many high-throughput products that perform roughly this function of finding karyotypic variants. Bionano sells an optical mapping product that claims to do this, I have not directly inspected their viability; their tech is slightly complex. Hi-C-seq is rather simpler and there are several competing firms that offer products that perform karyotyping:...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible