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6 votes

How to disambiguate between chromosome and chromosome pair?

This is standard. For a typical human diploid cell there are two copies of chromosome 1, two copies of chromosome 2, etc; you'd have either two copies of the X chromosome or one X and one Y. There's ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46k
4 votes

How do we know for sure that Morus nigra (black mulberry) is tetratetracontaploidic (has 44 copies of each of its seven chromosomes)?

The linked paper in the question has reference 8: Toyo I (1985) Research of polyploidy and its application in Morus. Japan Agricultural Research Quarterly 18: 222–228. PDF here This paper mentions a ...
bob1's user avatar
  • 12.4k
4 votes

Can a deletion occur on only one strand of a human chromosome?

As it appears that most deletions occur by mechanisms that do not involve large-scale strand separation (e.g. during crossing over or by translocation etc.) this is unlikely to happen (see e.g. ...
David's user avatar
  • 26k
4 votes

Can a deletion occur on only one strand of a human chromosome?

This is a somewhat semantic question. In terms of WHEN a deletion happens, I think it's commonly on only one strand as most mutations are caused by a collision from radiation or sometimes a chemical. ...
shigeta's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Are DRB3 DRB4 and DRB5 different genes or different version of the same gene

The reference to DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 as paralogues of DRB1 indicates that these are different genes. However, as paralogues they share essentially the same structure, having presumably originated ...
Darlingtonia's user avatar
  • 2,589
3 votes

What are the $2^{23}$ combinations in gamete fusion?

The calculation is actually quite simple. Each gamete can contribute one of two sister chromatids for each chromosome, so that in humans (with 23 distinct chromosomes) the number of possible ...
David's user avatar
  • 26k
2 votes

What are the $2^{23}$ combinations in gamete fusion?

Shouldn't it be that there are 2^23 different types of gametes possible from a single individual with 23 chromosomes? The math behind it is as follows: Case 1: Only one chromosome. Let's say, from the ...
Tanishq Meena's user avatar
2 votes

How frequently does recombination occur, and how long are the recombinated fragments?

When crossover happens, it's a whole swap from that point on, not just a little chunk. So if there's only one crossover event, then the lengths are "p" and "100% - p", where p is ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 46k
1 vote

Why is There a Necessity for Two Rounds of Cell Division and Four Daughter Cells in Meiosis

If I understand correctly, your idea is to say, it would also be possible to start with unduplicated chromosomes (no S-Phase), perform crossing over to increase the genetic variety and then to ...
Felix H.'s user avatar
  • 318

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