26

The concept you are referring to is speciation and it has been well studied in a wide variety of different natural organisms. I suppose here we are talking about the biological species concept. The overall answer is yes it is possible, but critically depends on a few different factors. The reality of speciation in the wild is very complex, but these are some ...


10

Two different species can have the same species epithet if they belong to different genera ('species name' is referring to the full binomial name). Consider for example Pinus glabra and Ilex glabra P. glabra I. glabra Two species can be have the same genus name (meaning they belong to the same genus) and will therefore necessarily have different species ...


9

You can certainly refer to short peptides by their sequence. I don't know of any exact boundaries, but I've seen tripeptides referred to by either their three letter codes (Ala-Asp-Asn) or even the chemical name (alanylaspartylasparagine) although obviously that gets ridiculous pretty quickly. As the largest known protein, titin also has the longest IUPAC ...


9

Introduction to phylogeny What makes that two species being closely related or not has nothing to do with whether they look a like or whether they live in similar environment. It has to do with their evolutionary history. Evolutionary history used to be inferred from phenotypic traits ('phenotype'≈'how an individual looks like') but today it is most often ...


9

They are either treated or even declared to be synonyms in all the texts using both of the terms that I have ever read. Just one reference: the nearest Flora on my desk, G. Marconi, F. Corbetta, Flora della Pianura Padana e dell'Appennino Settentrionale, uses the notation Compositae = Asteraceae. It is worth to note that Compositae, 'composite ones' in ...


8

I know nothing about lizards, but this looks like a Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis), also known as a green anole. Apparently they can change colour:


8

Short answer Sedges have edges, and they're in different families. See Minnesota Wildflowers for a great summary with images. Long answer Both are in the order Poales, but they are in different families: Grasses = Poaceae (of the graminid clade) Sedges = Cyperaceae (of the [non-monophyletic]1 cypirid lineage) Some anatomical differences: Compiled ...


7

In biradial symmetry, in addition to antero-posterior axis there are also two other axes or planes of symmetry at right angles to it and each other such as the sagittal or median verticular-longitudinal and transverse or cross axes. Such animals have two pairs of symmetrical slides i.e there are two planes of symmetry. You can visualize it as a combination ...


7

Creep is correct. I sent an email asking this question to The Tortoise Group, which is a non-profit organization whose mission statement is: Improving the lives of wild and desert tortoises through education. The Executive Director replied: It's a bale for turtles and a creep for tortoises. I am sure they could have come up with a better name! If you ...


7

Again, I would say: no, genus is not enough. Another example: boletes (specifically, genus Boletus). According to Wilderness College: One of the most common and well-known groups of edible wild mushrooms are the boletes or boletus species (Boletaceae) ... But Many species in this group are edible, with only a handful being poisonous. The poisonous ...


7

The NCBI Taxonomy staff places square brackets around the genus for some species (examples: [Bacillus] aminovorans, [Candida] auris) to indicate that they are misclassified*, meaning placed incorrectly in a higher taxonomic rank. References: https://support.nlm.nih.gov/knowledgebase/article/KA-03379/en-us


6

If you keep reading the next sentence it makes clear what is meant (emphasis mine): Crocodiles (subfamily Crocodylinae) or true crocodiles are large semiaquatic reptiles that live throughout the tropics in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. Crocodylinae, all of whose members are considered true crocodiles, is classified as a biological subfamily. A ...


6

The path is correct. The safest reading is to say that the lion shares a set of characteristics with the lungfish. You can also say that lion and carps are bony vertebrates (Euteleostomes). In evolutionary taxonomy, each taxon does not need to consist of a single ancestral node and all its descendants: it allows for groups to be excluded from their parent ...


6

I do not believe it will happen. There are multiple roadblocks: First, speciation time is measured in generations, not years. The human generation time is long, the 3000 generations mentioned in another answer for a fish translates to nearly 100,000 years. Are human populations not going to interbreed over a time span that long? Second, the speed of ...


5

This is a widespread issue amongst binomial names. Only the full binomial name has to be unique in nomenclature, and therefore many genera contain different organisms with the same specific epithet. As Remi.b has already mentioned, two organisms with binomial names that have the same species but different genus are very likely more different from each other ...


5

A taxon (plural taxa) is any taxonomic unit. For example, the class Mammalia is a taxon which includes all mammalian species. Similarly, a species is a taxon, Panthera tigris being the tiger. This taxon contains lower taxa, which are sub-species, such as Panthera tigris tigris (Bengal tiger) or Panthera tigris sumatrae (Sumatran tiger). Rank is simply the ...


5

It is natural to be confused because the consensus has changed over the years and is still not settled. In part this is because knowledge has been gained but remains incomplete, and in part it is a matter of opinion and aesthetics about what is best for usefulness at various levels of detail and understanding. The system put forth in the textbook seems to ...


5

It seems like the simple version of your question is: can anyone come up with even one example of 2 fungi species in the same genus in which one is edible and the other is not? Here's one example: The genus Amanita. This genus contains about 600 species and contains some very toxic species -- in fact, it's often considered one of the most deadly genera ...


5

In earlier days, biological classification systems were often described as artifical or natural, with natural systems reflecting the 'real' relationships among living beings, and artificial ones allowing classification only for some limited purpose (Gilmour, 1937). Natural systems were supposed to be based on a large number of characters, with a focus on ...


4

What I found was that creep is a collective noun. The professor Peter Trudgill uses the word in a chapter about collective nouns and the example is of tortoises. I don't know what book to tell you to look in though. He is professor of sociolinguistics. From a search on collective nouns for animals, turtles, and reptiles, I only found turtles having the ...


4

It is generally accepted now that Chlorophyta are Plantae (see here). They are more closely related to plants than any other group of organism. Protist is a kind of basket term for any eukaryotic unicellular organism that is not an animal, fungi or a plant which is a rather exclusionary definition. Personally, I think the kingdoms are pretty 'macro' ...


4

You can find discussions of problems with rank-based taxonomy in light of phylogenetics in Ereshefsky 1994, de Queiroz 1996 and Ereshefsky 2002. To summarize, the main problems they identify are: It's hard to define what exactly an "order", "family" or "genus" is; in particular, taxa at the same rank aren't always comparable. For example, order Hymenoptera, ...


4

The scientific name (better known as latin name or binomial name) of a species is unique to this species. No two species can have the same latin name. Also, a single species cannot have two different latin names. But of course, mistakes happen and we don't seem to bother too much about them (esp. when the two species are very unrelated; see What instances ...


3

Biradial symmetry is a type of symmetry in which there are two planes of symmetry passing through the principal axis. It is different from bilateral symmetry where there is only one plane of symmetry. The following image shows difference between biradial and radial symmetry: Another subtype of radial symmetry is pentamerous radial symmetry which has only ...


3

Another alternative is the Tree of Life web project, which includes species richness information in the lower levels of the tree and allows reasonably easy navigation of subtrees. You can find the animal portal here. EDIT -- another alternative, which is in active development, is this integration of Wikipedia and the Open Tree of Life Hyperbolic Tree.


3

There are quite a few biological homonyms (especially at the genus level, which apparently you aren't asking about). At the family taxonomic level, the Interim Register of Marine and Nonmarine Genera (IRMNG) currently lists 100 family names which are used for two or more distinct taxa.


3

Biological specimens are ordered in museums phylogenetically. So all the birds are in one place, and the insects in another. Fossils are generally kept in their own place. Different museums may have their own standards, but most sort specimens phylogenetically as well. But alphabetical sorting also happens. So that all the members of a family are in one ...


2

The correct answer is Monera. It is so because their cell wall is made up of peptidoglycan. Peptidoglycan, also known as murein, is a polymer consisting of sugars and amino acids that forms a mesh-like layer outside the plasma membrane of most bacteria, forming the cell wall. The sugar component consists of alternating residues of β-(1,4) linked N-...


2

Here are the first sentences from the wikipedia articles for platyheminthes and annelids: The flatworms, or Platyhelminthes, Plathelminthes, or platyhelminths (from the Greek πλατύ, platy, meaning "flat" and ἕλμινς (root: ἑλμινθ-), helminth-, meaning "worm")2 are a phylum of relatively simple bilaterian, unsegmented, soft-bodied invertebrates. The ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible