7

As I understand your question, dolphins (and other echolators) can more or less map out their "surroundings" (which might include nearby ice floes, for example). It sounds like you're asking if they can then transmit that knowledge to other members of their species. I don't know the answer, and I suspect no one does. However, it's hard to imagine why one ...


6

Are there (apart from those with no sense of hearing at all) any animals that are unable to hear human voices at all? I don't know of any examples off the top of my head, but let's think about this systematically. The voiced speech of a typical adult male will have a fundamental frequency from 85 to 180 Hz, and that of a typical adult female from 165 to ...


6

Do dogs and humans communicate? What about cats and dogs? I think defining "communicate" is the real question here. This 2012 study claims to show "the first experimental evidence that the interception of heterospecific vocalizations can mediate interactions between different cetacean species in previously unrecognized ways". In other word, one species is ...


5

As part of your question, you ask if other animals can create sound without continuous airflow. Many insects (e.g. cicadas and moths) do exactly this by using tymbals. A tymbal/timbal is an external membrane organ that is controlled by muscles or wing movements, that cause the membrane to flip back and forth, creating clicks or other sounds. So in many ways ...


4

This bit of the book Developmental Neuropsychiatry: Fundamentals describes the difference between the oral cavity in humans and other animals. It doesn't refer to Homo habilis in this context, but it says: As a result of this anatomical pattern, the range of sounds that an animal can make is limited because of the pharyngeal cavity, which is necessary of ...


4

Electrocommunication is used by weakly electric fish only and it is limited to aquatic environments where the electrical conductivity of the medium allows to transmit electric signals. The best studied fish species that use this communication method are The African Mormyriformes (which comprise the Mormyridae or elephantfish and the Gymnarchidae with ...


4

No — typical DNA extraction will not preserve information about the biochemical state of the cell. During the process of DNA extraction, proteins are removed and DNA from a population of cells gets precipitated. Then you dissolve the DNA. In this process native conformational state cannot be preserved. However there are techniques (see this post) that ...


4

Richard Dawkins discusses this in his book The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution. The birds, in the aforementioned example Starlings, 'know' which direction to fly and where to be by obeying simple local rules concerning the distance and spacing of other members of the flock in their immediate vicinity, without any global knowledge of the ...


4

Here is a list of woodwind instruments. Do you know of any (non-open) reed instrument that produces a note without anyone blowing air through them? Imagine a clarinet being played on someone's lap pouring out a melody. That would be very, very remarkable indeed. Our ability to produce sound from our throats is in theory like a reed instrument in music. Let'...


3

Be glad to answer your questions. fish also sounds. The difference is that they are put in different positions by the body to sound.The sound of fish is about 20HZ. Difficult to discern the human ear. But you can rely on instruments to imitate and perceived. Of course, some fish also relies purely on action to exchange summarize a sound.Some fish by ...


3

In bees that dance in the dark (not all do, some dance in the light) they don't watch the dance, they participate. The follow the dancer using their antenna and sound to keep track of them. Beehives are often dark, so instead of watching the scout dance, the recruit bees follow the dancer using their antenna and the sounds produced during the dance to ...


2

Darwin wrote a classical book on the subject, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and [other] Animals. Among other things, he showed how opposite emotions cause opposite movements. For instance, when angry/about to attack, a dog will lower its tail, erect the hair close to the neck, move the ears back, etc. The ears back serve the purpose of protecting the ...


2

Terms that may help you research are dead reckoning or path integration. From Wikipedia: In navigation, dead reckoning is the process of calculating one's current position by using a previously determined position, or fix, by using estimations of speed and course over elapsed time. The corresponding term in biology, used to describe the processes by which ...


2

To my knowledge, Chomsky does not claim that there is a specific gene or mutation responsible for the human linguistic abilities - at least not in strictly biological sense. The claims of Chomsky and his followers, known as generative grammar, are more general: the study and the comparison of many human languages have shown that all the languages are ...


2

The best article I found was this one. In it it says among other things that: Kanzi, an unusually intelligent Bonobo chimp trained at Georgia State University, was remarkable in that he learned to use around 200 symbols on a portable electronic symbol board, a computer with buttons in the shape of absolute arbitrary symbols rather than manual signs. More ...


1

Yes, humans can secrete and sense pheromones, e.g. female tears dampen male sexual arousal. Science 2011, 331(6014), 226-230 But then on the other hand, a key gene in mouse sex specific behavior (TRPC2) is a pseudogene, i.e. it is inactive, in humans. Nature 2007, 448, 1009-1014 If you look at the references in those papers you will probably find a lot ...


1

Many Ostracods (esp. the Cyprididae) use bioluminescence to attract mates. The Bermuda fireworm (a polychete worm) also uses bioluminescence to attract mates. If you have not yet, you should definitely have a look at wikipedia > Bioluminescence


1

In general, animal communication contains both "cultural" aspects and genetic components. As you suggest, the cultural aspects vary more across geographies and times. The genetic components might vary as well, with genetic differences among different populations, but you'd expect them to be more conservative than the cultural aspects. To make the matter ...


1

Animals most definitely can communicate through body language! It sounds like you have a good idea of some methods through which they communicate easily noticeable to humans. To give you an interesting example I've been looking at recently is the idea of 'vigilance' in wild species such as impala, elephants and giraffe. Mammals and birds are known to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible