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Four quick flaws: 1) Environments are always changing. The fitness space is dynamic, and includes both biological and non-biological players, the former which are also ever-changing. Given a sufficiently stable ecosystem, one would expect an equilibrium among species to develop (though it could be cyclical). However even if the environment stays constant, ...


4

Unfortunately the answer is highly dependent on what you mean. In the simplest terms, comparing it directly to how we measure data storage in digital media, the number of different states of a DNA string of length $n$ can have is simply $4^n$. A byte holds $2^8$ different states so the number of bytes in a DNA string of length $n$ is $\frac{n}{4}$. Of course,...


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Edit: I would define genetic complexity as either genome size or number of genes. Either answer or information would work. Largest genome: Paris japonica, a rare plant. Its genome is 149,000,000,000 base pairs large. Approximately 50 times larger than the human genome, by base pair count. Higher number of genes in an organism: Daphnia pulex, a very common ...


3

This is a very interesting question. Not sure if there is any way to answer without specifying a definition for complexity. It is clear that everything is made of only the same few elements, so complexity must involve more than that. Do the number and position of identical molecules matter? If so, size matters and we would label a large jelly-fish as more ...


3

Here's food for thought. Entropy is always considered to flow naturally in a direction of order, to disorder. That is, the higher entropy a system has, the greater degree of disorder it has, and the less amount of work it can perform. Now, look at a cell. It is a biological system of organic molecules that are able to organise themselves in a way that ...


2

You might also be interested in this paper from EMBL-EBI about storing data on DNA. Towards practical, high-capacity, low-maintenance information storage in synthesized DNA They show they can get 757,051 bytes or a Shannon information 10 of 5.2 × 106 bits onto 153,335 strings of DNA, each comprising 117 nucleotides (nt). George Church had a similar paper ...


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