8

We call it Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Consequences The phenomenon is observed worldwide and is pretty serious. Northern Ireland lost 50% of its beehives for example. Between 1997 and 2003, 10 millions beehives were lost. Many cultivated crops are pollinated by bees and we don't quite have an alternative today. In 2005 a study showed that the worth of ...


6

Black Rhino, status: critically endangered With around 5000+ black rhinos left in existence, and population numbers seemingly recovering (up from ~2400 in 1995), the black rhino is not really under any immediate threat.* The major threats to black rhinos is poaching (for the rhino horn trade), and, with prices for rhino horn increasing, it looks like it ...


5

Species don't live in isolation As simple as the question seems, it actually contains some issue in the conceptualization of a species in isolation that affect or does not affect its environment. Species do not exist in isolation from others. Many species have very important impact on their environment. These transformations would yield the environment to be ...


4

The problem is not really that we don't understand some stuff (lthough this is certainly true) but that an ecosystem, or the biosphere is a highly complex network of interactions. This network is continuously displaying some chaotic (determinist but not foreseeable) behavior. In such a system it becomes very hard or practically impossible to predict what the ...


4

This book "A primer of conservation genetics" would suit quite well I think. In particular chapter five deals with "Genetics and Extinction" and is preceded by a lot of population genetics based theory. A beginner might also combine it with "A primer of ecological genetics" (Hartl & Conner) but you seem to have enough Pop gen knowledge to not need it! ...


3

If you're interested in learning about the mathematics of population genetics, Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory by Alan Templeton is an absolutely amazing resource. If you check out the index, here are entries under population structure: assortative mating, admixture, linkage disequilibrium, coarse-grained spatial heterogeneity, gene flow, ...


3

First, for the record, I do not know the North American Starling situation well. However, I know of one study (Koenig, 2003) that failed to find strong effects of Starlings on other cavity nesters (i.e. looking at effects from cavity competition). When trying to control for other effects, only one species was potentially negatively effected by Starlings. ...


3

Yes it is. Besides Dr. Knights article which is very focused on the issue and describes numerous benefits, there are other sources of research that show this can be good not only for the animals but also the community. And specifically that this has worked in Namibia (where the black rhino was hunted) extremely well. Namibia has encouraged communities to ...


3

You can search for species that are "Extinct" or "Extinct in the wild" at the IUCN red list website (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources). That list currently includes 903 species, but some of the assessments might be obsolete (see annotations). From that list, you can click and get some basic information about each species. ...


3

Lots of insects are considered threatened and endangered. The global IUCN Red List (International Union for Conservation of Nature), which is arguably the most important tool for evaluating species' threats globally, is listing 1382 insects as threatened (categories: Near threatened, vulnerable, endangered, criticaly endangered and extinct) and this includes ...


3

I am not aware of a better list, but you are right that (1) many insects have gone extinct recently, and (2) documentation of insect extinction is poor. An article in Conservation Biology (2005) says The biodiversity crisis is undeniably an insect biodiversity crisis. Yet insect conservation remains the awkward “kid sister” to vertebrate conservation. ...


3

Remi.b's answer is spot on - predicting the effects of losing a given species is nigh on impossible. However, I do think that there are some general trends that can give us some intuition, and make the campaign to protect certain species more than just an ethical issue. Biodiversity (i.e. having a wide range of different organisms (and genetically diverse ...


2

Those are very good questions. Unfortunately answers are not easy and ask for writing a lot! But maybe someone else will give it a try and make it better than I can. Note that the evolution of recombination and of sexual reproduction are not quite the same thing. Also, evolution of sexual reproduction is not the same than evolution from various reproductive ...


2

Short answer: They were talking about the wild species. Using the presentation by a Farm Advisor and a Pomologist, Pistachio Cultivars as a rough indication of the state of the species, we see that the commercial crop does not have much diversity. Probably 97% or more of the pistachio acreage in California is planted to the Pistacia vera female cultivar ...


2

Cloning become an important method for conservation genetics. However, it is not a magical solution and doesn't solve all of the the problems. There are two key considerations with conservation: short term issues which are causing the immediate threat such as poaching, habitat destruction etc. and long term issues of genetic variation. Genetic variation is ...


2

She was probably referring to ex-situ conservation as a way to complement in-situ conservation. Indeed, if a population is endangered and fragmentation it thought to be one of the main factors causing the decline, it can sometime be hard to restore the habitat in a way that would permit the population reestablishment (in-situ conservation). Ex-situ ...


2

Informally speaking, there is no real/good way to bring back extinct species. Especially sexually reproducing species; you'd need to revive a male and a female at the very least, and these are markedly different genomes due to unique sex chromosomes. Some 'bad ways' exist though; in principle, if you found a perfectly preserved nucleus (the organelle that ...


1

First, it isn't entirely clear to me why you would want such a database. Essentially all sequences are available in one (typically all) of the big databases. For example if I search the NCBI database for "extinct" I get this. There will be many more sequences for species that are "only" endangered. Second, having a genome sequence isn't sufficient for "...


1

A potential data source could the data base that stores zoo animal data, where the most comprehensive (to my knowledge) is Species360 ZIMS (Zoological Information Management System). It contains animal records and current breeding programmes, but also information on how to care for animals (best-practices and studbooks). In your case, the ZIMS for Studbooks ...


1

Yellowstone National Park ecosystem will serve as a good example of this question. Here is a link to an youtube video describing the situation pre and post introduction of grey wolves to Yellowstone (around 1940). As you can infer from the video, when the wolves were hunted to the point they were non-existent in Yellowstone, the herbivores (majorly moose/elk)...


1

Although we think of parasites as harmful and tend not to consider them for conservation, they do peform valuable functions including population regulation and the development of immune systems. More philosophically, under the 'intrinsic value' argument sometimes used for conservation, every species should be considered to have an intrinsic right to ...


1

It appears to be a California Alligator Lizard - Elgaria multicarinata (subspecies multicarinata), although another photo from the side would be helpful for a positive ID. This species seems to fit the range for the observation as well. According to CaliforniaHerps.com, there are no associated conservation concerns for this particular species. Elgaria ...


1

Insecticides in the form of neonicotinoids (and possibly similar substances) can certainly be a factor, and they can affect a wide range of pollinating insects. It is also commonly used on rape seed. Have a look at this paper for some background: Rundlöf et al. 2015. Seed coating with a neonicotinoid insecticide negatively affects wild bees. Nature (written ...


1

I don't think your core question can be answered exactly, namely "...the theoretical maximum population to which the Tiger species could be restored", since there are too many variables to consider. However, the comment from @Remi.b is apt, in the sense that it shows that population growth rate per se (or reproductive rate) should not be the limiting factor. ...


1

Not supported by "science," but supported by logic. The bottom line is this: the rangers were GOING TO KILLER THE RHINO ANYWAY. The older male rhino was aggressive and actually killing other rhinos. So, we have three scenarios: Leave the rhino, letting it kill several more rhinos. Have a park ranger kill the aggressive rhino (so that one rhino dies ...


1

Minimum viable population (MVP) can be predicted in two ways. Computer simulations. Population viability analyses (PVA) PVA is considered generally more common practice by ecologists and without a reference to the 1600 panda population you mention, my guess would be that this is what they did. PVAs work well for endangered species prediction. A typical ...


1

Dehorning of rhinos has been tried with limited success. Poachers have killed dehorned rhinos anyway, either out of spite or to avoid tracking worthless prey in the future. There is the problem of anesthesia (always a risk) and the fact that rhino horns are usually not destroyed but saved in the event of decriminalization. But at least horn grows back. ...


1

Various factors from different sources: -- Diseases like Anther Smut Disease (reference). -- Rampant use of herbicides. -- Invasion of exotic pest species (reference). -- Spatiotemporal variation in the pollination of Silene virginica by the ruby-throat hummingbird which is its principal pollinator (reference).


1

In some ways tangent to what you are asking, but many cases of classical Allée effects (i.e. a positive relationship between population growth rate and population size, see Allée & Bowen, 1932, Drake & Kramer, 2011) should be relevant, especially after your clarification in the comments. One famous, early example of species collapse and extinction ...


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