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29

Yes, this is the effect of the vaccine. A reduction of infections of over 88%, a reduction of severe cases and death by 95% and higher. See reference 1 for the details. Data from the ReCoVAM Study from Malaysia (unfortunately only not yet published, so see here) shows a reduction of infection by 88% and a reduction of admission to ICU/death by up to 96%. So ...


0

One and a half year later we see that the L strain (corresponding to Pango lineage B and all of its descendants, and to all Nextstrain clades except 19B) was winning the evolutionary race, mostly because of the emergence of Pango lineage B.1/Nextstrain clade 20A with mutations ORF1b:P314L and S:D614G that had a decisive advantage over the other virus ...


2

As I have already mentioned in the comments, the mutation rates are indeed different, at least in some viruses. As an example we can take HIV, where pol, gag, and other genes essential for viral replication and interference with the cellular machinery are singificantly more conserved than the env gene, coding for the viral envelope. Mutations vs. ...


3

The answer is that drugs and vaccines do different things. Drugs treat the problem (sometimes before it starts - this is known as a prophylactic), whereas vaccines are intended to prevent the problem from starting in the first place, so vaccines are a form of prophylactic themselves. One of the problem with drugs is that the vast majority of them have some ...


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