14

Turns out this is harder than it seems from just the picture... The three candidates I think one could most argue for are: Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) Grey Birch (Betula populifolia) Here is a picture of Populus tremuloides from the USDA: Notice the smoothness of the above Aspen bark (identical to that of the ...


7

Many ornamental cherries are grown on a hardier root stock, that is, they are propagated by grafting onto hardy wild cherry saplings. This is because the ornamental variety will not produce offspring that are true to the parents, if they produce offspring at all. All are grafted plants and mainly on wild cherry (gean) rootstock. Such trees should be ...


5

The scientific answers are pretty clear: Gingkos are not closely related to the conifers, they are closer related to the cycads. See this phylogenetic tree based on the 18S RNA from paper 2: It shows that conifers and Ginkgos are relative close related, but not on the same sub-branch of the tree. The last common ancestor between Ginkgos and Conifers is ...


4

The exact term — wetwood, is used only once in the original article (Yip et al., 2018). Others have found that water content of heartwood tissue was the best predictor of methane flux across multiple plant species (Machacova et al., 2016; Wang et al., 2017), however this was not a strong predictor of methanogen relative abundance in our analyses. It is ...


4

This is an interesting question for me because my first research internship centered pretty much entirely around this. It got pretty deep into the weeds as this was a CS, rather than biology, internship and we were mostly analyzing the math behind the allometry (e.g. Log-transformed linear vs. nonlinear regression for fitting the curve, OLS vs. RMA ...


4

I think they are birch trees (Betula), based on the white bark with black horizontal patterns (Lenticels). The bark patterns at the base of the trees are also very similar to birch. Either way (relating to one of the comments), it's an autumn picture, where both birch and aspen have yellow leafs (aspen leaves can also be red or reddish, especially at the end ...


3

The difference has to do with the concept of "thinning and heading" and how plants respond to abiotic damage. Thinning refers to the removal of a branch or shoot all the way back to the node which it originated from. This is the primary type of pruning used on trees - either to limit growth or to increase the amount of light permeating to lower branches. ...


3

The answer I got from Jan Kolář of Charles University: The spores of fungi or bacteria in apples don't just emerge from nothing, they have to get into it from the surroundings. I often see apples, which rot while still hanging on the tree, the hole needed for the infection of the apple is usually made by a worm. The problem of the apples near roads isn't ...


3

The reason most apples are produced from grafted trees is that apples don't breed true. In a large number of crops, you have "lines" of crops. Basically, if you breed two plants of the same cultivar together, their offspring are similar enough to both parents that it performs like the parents. The reason for this is that these crop lines have been ...


2

According to such sources as North Dakota State University Ag Department (https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/hort/info/fruit/graft.htm) one primary reason for continued grafting is unaltered reproduction. Apparently some fruit stocks (scions, in grafting terminology) will produce true fruit, but the seeds within the fruit will not be genetically identical to the ...


2

The height is only one of a few factors; also the species and environment are more significant. A spruce growing in unshaded location may have branches to ground level while the same species in a dense woods will only have branches at the top. A southern pine ( in the US) is often 100 ft tall with all the branches in the top 30 ft ; these trees drop the ...


1

Not exactly about height-to-branch ratio but an answer more about branching geometry in general. This is my interpretation of a related question on Reddit, "What determines when/where a branch will grow on a tree?" especially from one answer which I've quoted below. It clarifies a primary mechanism involved. The apical meristem (leader branch / tip of the ...


1

Not as a confident answer but as a comment... to provide image. The wood TS looks like ring-porous, Oak (Quercus sp.) wood (Not as identification but anatomical features are comparable). The dark bands (radial here) seems to be xylem fibres, and bright bands (radial here), seems to be xylem parenchyma. This is a magnified image of wood of post oak (...


1

The rings are not only affected by time but also by location. So no, the patterns are not always the same depending where you are. Climate do affect the rings. Typically a major factor affecting ring patterns is the seasonality. Depending on the number of rainy season, you might observe one or two rings per year. If interested, here is an introduction to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible