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53

The answer to your question is yes it is certainly possible. At one time it was thought that there was something special about "organic" chemicals which meant that they could not be artificially synthesised out of fundamental elements. In 1828 Frederick Wöhler synthesised urea (CO(NH2)2) which is often taken as the first demonstration that the organic v ...


36

Living organisms can be divided into hetrotrophs and autotrophs. Autotrophs like plants and algae are able to produce complex organic compounds from relatively simple inorganic components. They are satisfied with sunlight, water and other abiotic stuff and do not need to consume "life". We -- along with all other animals -- are not autotrophs, but ...


20

Even on a purely synthetic diet, your body would still use living cells as an energy source. Our bodies contain more bacterial cells than human, mostly contained in our gut. These microbes process any nutrients we ingest and when they die, we absorb their cellular components as nutrition. The lining of the gut is the most rapidly dividing population of ...


15

Of course eggs are not vegetarian. Eggs are, well, the eggs of chickens (usually). Chickens are animals so their eggs are animal matter as well. Whether or not the egg has been fertilized is completely irrelevant, eggs are chicken just as much as drumsticks are. The color of the egg has nothing at all to do with it. All eggs are, by definition, animal cells....


14

Your question is phrased somewhat ambiguously as to whether you're asking about the theoretical possibility, the feasibility, or the practical ability in everyday life. 1) Theoretically, yes. It is chemically possible to produce all substances that humans need to survive without the use of living organisms in the process. In the end, biological systems use ...


9

Depends on how you define "life"? Is unfertilized chicken eggs alive? What about cow milk? Well there are bacteria in it. What if you get rid of that bacteria? Then some people would not be able to utilize lactose... Also as Bez mentioned rice grains are quiescent, meaning they are in a dormant state and not really "alive" but again depends on how you ...


9

It boils down to the anatomy. Herbivores are very good at digesting plant matter, which us monogastrics are not particularly good at. Many herbivores (such as ruminants) have large, highly developed gastrointestinal tracts containing symbiotic bacteria to allow them to digest plant matter. Once the cellulose in the plant cell walls is digested, the animal ...


9

Here is a link to the Public Health Statement for Aluminum produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States. There is much more information on the web page but the following are some of the more pertinent points to your question. Potential Health Effects Workers Workers who breathe large amounts of aluminum dusts ...


8

There are many reasons for why people eat meat. Some of them are to be discussed here and some of them have nothing to do with biology. Reasons that have nothing to do with biology There are many reasons that are not to be discussed on Biology.SE. These include cultural reasons, the reasons related to taste and appreciation, farming and availability, price ...


7

Question: Is it possible for humans to live healthy long lives without eating any type of life, i.e no animals, no plants? First, according to a definition of a living organism(biology-online), milk is not live, because it does not have an ability to reproduce itself, among other... My claim: If you consider milk and honey non-live (no DNA), then, yes, ...


7

From a theoretical perspective this is a very interesting question, mostly because it is difficult to completely abstain from carbohydrate intake on a normal diet. Even the popular low carb diets of the late 1990s and early 2000s (e.g. Atkins Diet, South Beach Diet) were just that, they were Low Carb, Not No Carb. We know there are essential dietary ...


7

Short answer Any law of physics will of course be applicable to living beings. However, in the absence of mass gain and mass loss, the input = output equation for matter holds true and does not require any spontaneous creation and destruction of matter to equate. In other words, the effects of Einstein's discovery has no measurable/practical consequence on ...


7

First of all, for those readers with less knowledge of the general principles of biology, I want to state an important, even if obvious, point: The brain doesn't "prefer" anything. Despite being the smartest organ in the body, it is subjected (like any other biological system) to changes in the concentrations of the substances in question, that is, glucose ...


6

This is kind of a weird/trick question. How long do you want the animal to live? If the lifespan is shortened or compromised does that fit.... Obligate carnivores (cats, dogs) do eat plant material. In the wild cats mainly eat grass to get rid of hairballs. Cats are more impacted by phytotoxins than dogs. However, both, are extremely vulnerable to ...


6

No. It is possible but extraordinarily impractical to nourish yourself without killing animals, plants or even bacteria, as many have explained in detail. However, your immune system constantly kills pathogens that infect your body. What's worse, the macrophages literally catch and eat these bacteria alive, so you are very much "consuming" them. You could ...


6

You hit upon several ideas in your post. First, you are absolutely correct that body fat is composed both of lipids and water, so a 10kg weight loss does not correspond to 90,000 kcals. The most commonly accepted figure is 7700 kcals per kg of body fat lost (Hall, 2008), but this is a rule of thumb at best. The translation from caloric deficit to body fat ...


6

1. What was the original research paper? This one appears close: Hyperphagia in rats produced by a mixture of fat and sugar (PubMed, 1990) Experimental groups were fed sugar (sucrose), fat (corn oil), or a sugar-fat mixture as an option to chow; options were in the form of water solutions or emulsions. The control group was fed only chow. The sugar-...


6

No, the mass-energy convertibility has no practical relevance to biology. The amount of mass produced or lost in the chemical reactions in biological systems is so small as to be immeasurable and is ignored for biological purposes (other than the conversions which happen as consumed radioactive elements decay). One needs a nuclear reactor, atom bomb, or ...


6

When the mother eat beans, the fiber (oligosaccharides) from them is not digested in the small intestine, so it travels to the large intestine, where normal intestinal bacteria break it down to some absorbable nutrients (like short-chain fatty acids) and gas that is largerly expelled (fao.org). Some gas can be absorbed into the blood and then removed by the ...


6

Many wild animals will not eat in captivity because they are under stress, few mammals react well to captivity. weird smells and sounds, restricted movement, inability to hide, there are dozens of stressful aspects to captivity that trigger the flight or fight response for small mammals. Lack of appetite is a common stress response in mammals and even when ...


5

As it turns out, dairy products do not produce phlegm in the majority of people (the exception is the tiny group of people who are allergic to casein, the protein in some types of milk). Instead, the high fat content in dairy products thickens the mucous that is already present in a person’s airway, making it seem like there is more phlegm to deal with. Of ...


5

coconut oil is composed mainly of medium-chain triglycerides, 1)it is smaller than other long-chain triglycerides so that it can be digested easily, 2)the digestion of coconut oil does not involve in the Pancreatic digestive enzyme system, 3) liver prefer use medium-chain triglycerides as the fuel sources 4) medium-chain triglycerides will convert to ...


5

No, it is not. There are no nuclear fission or fusion reactions being performed in a biological context, for reasons that should be immediately obvious. Mass is not being converted to energy, or vice versa, when we generate heat or create or break chemical bonds. Biological systems are covered by the laws of the conservation of mass and energy, so kgin $=$ ...


5

Like other Corvids (Jays, Crows, and Ravens), Blue Jays are omnivorous and can eat and digest both animal and plant matter. Animal matter can include insects, carrion, small birds and mammals, and the eggs of other birds. Then there is plant matter including corn, seeds, etc. Your catfood was not only convenient but contains a good source of both animal and ...


5

The simple answer is humans are omnivores - physiologically - as we have the capability to digest both plant and animal matter. Many humans are behavioural omnivores as well, consuming both as part of their diet, although many people can and do live while consuming only plant products. Most if not all humans can or could digest animal products in some form -...


4

It may be feasible to live without consuming anything that was alive, but it would be incredible difficult. For example, all humans need to consume glucose to survive. Glucose is the only food source used by cells in the brain. Plants are the easiest source of food source for glucose. If we can't get glucose from plants, then we would need to synthesize it ...


4

Well, technically if you are eating something from a plant or animal without killing that plant or animal, then technically you would not be "consuming life" as nothing as been killed. Fruits, for example, can be removed from the tree without harming it and in fact are meant to be removed as that is how the tree reproduces. Ditto with berries, melons, squash,...


4

First: My opinion on why the question has received that many down votes There were many down votes to this question, not because the question is no of interest. The question actually makes sense and is interesting. The post attracted those down votes because the post and the comments of the OP shows little understanding of evolutionary processes. Here are ...


4

This is not a yes / no question. Many tortoise eat plants (veggies and fruits) while some turtles eat fish too. Snakes are basically predators and do not dwell on plants neither do most of the lizards. I think if a reptile is capable of digesting plant food in general, then it should be able to digest preprocessed grains as well. Edit: As for whole intact ...


4

The short and unsatisfying answer is no-- it remains controversial due to lack of high quality randomized clinical trials. According to an article in UptoDate, a reliable resource for many physicians, last updated September 2014, there is an association between acne and intake of milk in which milk components could exacerbate acne. Unfortunately, there have ...


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