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Even a male cell can count the number of X chromosomes. (Lee et al. 1996; Cell 86: 83-84) When X inactivation is getting started the two chromosomes "kiss" - a process that lasts for a couple of hours (first shown by Jeannie Lee in 1996). The physical contact between two X chromosomes is over a small fraction of the chromosome but it's essential for ...


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No, you cannot pellet dissolved DNA with ultracentrifugation. Yes, you can recover a pellet with additional treatments, similarly to how you got it in the first place; only instead of your input being homogenized cells, or tissue, or extract, or whatever you used to obtain your DNA, it would now just be your aqueous solution of DNA. For instance, you may ...


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Perhaps you are referring to so-called "duons" (dual-use codons) discovered by Stergachis et al.. This paper was published a bit more than six years ago. A recent paper within the last 2-3 years references duons implicated in photosynthesis. Duons essentially extend the idea that conserved coding DNA encodes proteins, but can in fact also preferentially ...


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It seems canadianer's intuition is correct -- Base stacking still occurs in ssDNA, so I suspect that is why you see a temperature dependence -- based on this paper: Conformational Changes in Single-Strand DNA as a Function of Temperature by SANS Motivation -- UV absorption-based measurement of DNA melting temperature is reliant on the assumption that ...


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The main difference in stability is due to the very high amounts of RNase in pretty much all fresh biological materials. Naked RNA is easily degraded by just touching it with skin. The first step in most RNA extractions is often to add an RNase inhibitor. For example, from Wikipedia's Ribonuclease; RNase contamination during RNA extraction: The ...


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Article links to this publication which has all the information needed: https://academic.oup.com/nsr/advance-article/doi/10.1093/nsr/nwaa036/5775463 It is mentioned in the paper that: Although we found only 4% variability in genomic nucleotides between SARS-CoV-2 and a bat SARS-related coronavirus (SARSr-CoV; RaTG13), the difference at neutral sites ...


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Short answer: probably not. Long answer: for your body to build immunity against something, it needs to identify it as something harmful to you. Otherwise, how would it know if this is just some random particle in your environment that it should ignore? There are molecular clues that your body uses to recognize better whether something is likely a pathogen ...


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One could argue that any informative polymer must have more than two different monomers in its primary structure in orden to contain biological information. One could make an analogy to having a language in which any word contains two letters. Any word contained on such languague, like aaaabbbbb or ababababa for example, would essencially be devoid of ...


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To answer your question multiple parameters which one should be taken into account. There are two main sets of parameters: gene specific and cell line specific. Parameters related to your specific gene of interest : Do you know the half-life of the RNA of your gene of interest? Most of the time it is not known but there are several tools and resources ...


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