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There is an implicit assumption in the question that current technology can obtain the correct sequences for each of the two homologous chromosomes (for all chromosome pairs) of a diploid individual. That is beyond the state of the art today. In a few special circumstances, the latest methods can begin to approach that goal. For instance, where the parents ...


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Your question is closely related to the concept of minimal genomes, in which researchers attempt to understand the significance of genes by removing everything that isn't strictly necessary, which includes "broken" genes, redundant genes, intergenic regions, etc. The typical result is a much more fragile and less functional organism. Much of this ...


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The answer to this question is very much no. Genomes are of arbitrary length and structural organisation (i.e. ploidy), so there isn't a fixed number of 'slots' that different base-pairs could inhabit (like e.g. rolling a dice). As a consequence (and as jamesfq mentioned in the comments), no matter what genome you have, you can always add additional levels ...


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You have it mostly right, however, you are misunderstanding what has gone on here a little. The definition from Springer is correct - a targeted gene disruption is a direct replacement of the gene with a non-functional one. However, to do so you also need some method of detecting that your gene disruption worked and will persist. This is most commonly done ...


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As the OP asked about mice, I am mostly going to talk about organism-level things here. First of all it is important to distinguish between knock-down and knock-out. Knock-out is where a gene is either removed or made non-functional and as such will never be able to be turned on again. This may in some cases be compensated for by having heterozygous animals, ...


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It would help a bit to get the exact quote from the text. That definition doesn't seem to agree with what I find when I research the term. For prokaryotes, I find the term here but it is poorly defined and does not agree with what you write. It is described as a "naked" chromosome that is only DNA, but that also doesn't make sense as bacterial ...


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tl;dr although basenjis are an "ancient" dog lineage and although they live in an area that has never been part of wolves' geographic range, they are thought (like all other dogs) to have originated in Asia by splitting off from wolves, after which their ancestors migrated to Africa sometime around 15,000 years ago. Domestic dogs are thought to be ...


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From physics point of view, annealing is about finding the lowest energy configuration of the two DNA strands. The configuration space of two strands has many minima, and after every annealing cycle the strands settle in one of them, which is not necessarily the lowest. One then reheats the DNA to allow it to explore teh surrounding minima and hopefully ...


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What is meant by complexity? This is the crux of the matter. As is often the case, confusion arises from not defining one’s terms. In this case the three possibilities we have to deal with are: The extent to which a sequence is not homogenous. e.g. ATATATAT is more complex than AAAAAAAA; ATGCATGC is more complex than ATATATAT; ATGCTCAG is more complex than ...


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You are correct that this won't produce the correctly complemented strands 100% of the time, indeed that's what the experiments outlined in the link you provided are aiming to measure... how much DNA is duplexed over time after a single denaturation. Simple sequences will be so alike that an approximation of 100% can anneal fairly quickly, as measured by the ...


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It sounds like your guess was right and the exception is the lagging strand. The statement is phrased poorly, but it seems like they were going for the lagging strand. Either they meant for you to think that -the lagging strand is growing 3' to 5' or, more likely, -the polymerase is only synthesizing on one (leading) strand at a time While technically the ...


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I basically agree with Bob, but wanted to add a few more details. Out of the options that you have available, option 4 is the most common way to do it. I wouldn't consider options 1 and 3. I don't think option 1 will really work to produce the amount of plasmid that you need, option 2 is a much easier way of amplifying it. As for option 3, you shouldn't need ...


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Option 2 is your simplest and easiest. It should give you unlimited plasmid to work from. Note that ordering pre-made sequences of this size isn't particularly cheap and might take a few weeks to get to your destination. It may be easier (quicker + cheaper) to find a plasmid with the luciferase CDS and terminator already built in. You could then amplify this ...


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