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DNA in cells in general replicates when cell division occurs (unless it is a cell that contains many nuclei or multiple copies of its own genome, in which case DNA would replicate as copies are made. Multinucleate cells include things like the mycelium of fungi, and here is an example of a bacterium with thousands of copies of its own genome). As long as a ...


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I would suggest in the future doing a small amount of research before asking. For example, the wikipedia page for euchromatin says this: Euchromatin participates in the active transcription of DNA to mRNA products. The unfolded structure allows gene regulatory proteins and RNA polymerase complexes to bind to the DNA sequence, which can then initiate the ...


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As a point of order, the existence of DNA was demonstrated first by Miescher long before these terms came up (around 1870). He called it "nuclein" but he pretty fully characterized it chemically. However, it was not until the 1944 Avery-Macleod-McCarty experiment published in 1944 that DNA was shown to be the hereditary material. Now a partial ...


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It seems this therapy is targeted to liver cells. Cells that are affected will continue to express the inserted gene as long as they last, and any dividing cells will spread it to their daughter cells. Genetic information is passed on to the next generation through germline cells: eggs and sperm. There won't be any effect on the next generation unless these ...


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Yes, a full kiwi. The method is rather crude and the yield you get is not so high, because you will not break up all cells and also loose some of the DNA which is bound to the cell debris. Lab filter paper of course works as well, as would a fine cloth (cheese cloth for example). The receipe is designed to work with stuff that people have usually in their ...


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It's a little hard to tell based on your question, but it seems that you want to do Illumina sequencing of FFPE tissue samples. This is quite routine, Illumina sells kits for it. I do not know how the FFPE process affects microbial cells, but people have published recently on doing metagenomic analysis of FFPE tissue samples. This suggests to me that it is ...


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When describing mutations, $\Delta$ usually stands for deleted sequences. In this case it means the exchange of 4 cysteine residues in the NCAM protein by serines to disable palmitoylation and the association of the protein to lipid rafts. If you search for this specific mutation, you will find the paper from Niethammer et al., 2003, which describes the ...


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