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6

That's likely a raccoon and a dead fish (salmon, perhaps). For the animal on the left: notice the ringed tail, foot anatomy, and lighter foot color, and variable (light/dark) fur color: University of Arizona Furbearer Conservation University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Note: Since you mentioned opossums, I include the above to show the vast ...


2

This isn't a complete or exclusive answer, but inversions can contribute heavily to reproductive isolation. A crossover within the region inverted in one homologous chromosome of a hybrid, but not the other, will typically mean one end of the chromosome is absent in the offspring, which is generally not a good idea. Nonetheless, within the same species it ...


5

I'd suggest looking at this article, which contains an intuitive model for how hybrid incompatibilities can arise between isolated sister taxa (i.e. populations). This criterion of pre-existing isolation is an important factor in most models. I think that one thing that is missing from your representation of speciation is that you are assuming that every ...


6

This article from the humane society suggests that the male-female ratio in wild turkeys is generally 1:1 1. It's likely that nothing 'happens' to the male turkeys. Possibly you and your family may be miscounting some males as females; you mention in your comment the big tail feathers, but both sexes have fairly long tail feathers so that may not always be ...


2

No, there are no known cases (unless anecdotal evidence from lifelong marine mammal observers exists, which is possible). The best candidate for such a phenomenon would be the sperm whale due to its large size and the presence of teeth. Baleen whales could potentially injure an orca, but would not be able to eat it. However, I think even in the case of sperm ...


0

Birth rate cannot increase exponentially with the number of avaliable resourses. Each birth requires some amount of resources, so it increases at best linearly. In reality, there is some limit on how much resources each specie can process, so the birth rate is limited.


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