6

I'm no expert - just like browsing pictures, so totally open to other suggestions. I think this is the Mango Hawkmoth/Sphinx moth (Amplypterus panopus), which is a fairly widespread moth of SE Asia, including Vietnam and Thailand. You can see the pink of the underwings (terminology?) here and you can see the big lines across the wings. If you imagine the ...


5

I went to images.bing.com and typed Brassica pest lepidoptera, which led immediately to photos of the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) I thought this image was particularly persuasive.


4

These are not eggs, they are rose leaf galls caused by the spiny rose gall wasp (Diplolepis bicolor) larva that encases itself inside the gall and then matures and chews a hole in the gall to escape in spring, laying its eggs on a newly emerged leaf bud. The larvae generate the gall in the fresh leaves, perpetuating the cycle. Remove the galls in late summer ...


2

Yes--this is possible and has been done, e.g.: DNA barcoding identifies Eimeria species and contributes to the phylogenetics of coccidian parasites (Eimeriorina, Apicomplexa, Alveolata) (doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2011.03.007) Developing an Apicomplexan DNA Barcoding System to Detect Blood Parasites of Small Coral Reef Fishes (doi: 10.1645/16-93) DNA barcoding ...


2

That...looks like a brown recluse spider. The picture is a bit dark so I'm not 100% sure, but they can be identified by a violin-shaped marking on their back. Apparently they are very common in homes Kansas. Illinois Department of Public Health They are nocturnal: Brown recluse spiders are mostly nocturnal, coming out at night to hunt for their insect prey....


1

Found it using the terms "inchworm species washington" in google. It is the Winter Moth (Operophtera brumata). This is a common species of invasive pest in the USA and Canada, introduced from Europe. It is an "inchworm" or "looper" as they are known colloquially. The caterpillars have yellowish rings on the body at the segments ...


1

In lieu of any better thoughts: Thrips (Thysanoptera). A large diverse group of tiny insects generally approximately 1 mm long. Well known for being invasive pests of many plant species, and being capable of transmitting a number of plant viruses. Which of the many species this would be, I don't know, but likely a common one like the Onion Thrips (Thrips ...


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