5

They don't always 'get away with it'! A study by Pascoal et al. (2014) found that field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) on Oahu and Kauai islands of Hawaii have lost the ability to produce sound after an invasive wasp that is acoustically oriented to prey was introduced to the islands within this century. There are a few mutation to the crickets' wing ...


5

For loud calls to be stable in large-population evolutionary dynamics, the fitness benefit from the call (e.g., mate attraction) must exceed the fitness costs from the call (e.g., predator attraction). Individual species can 'solve for' benefit > costs by any number of devious tricks. One classic trick used by noisy insects (e.g., cicadas) is 'predator ...


4

The better entymologists among us may need to correct me, but I believe you are looking at a robber fly, especially based on the characteristic long, tapering abdomen, as well as the proboscis that reminded you of a mosquito and the large size. I see a couple people posting images from Texas that look a bit like yours (especially the all-black body) on ...


3

These seem to both be Neurothemis taiwanensis. On iNaturalist, if you search for dragonflies in Taiwan, it finds 104 species observed and submitted, and this Neurothemis taiwanensis is the most popularly-submitted species. Browsing the gallery of photos in their database shows both red and orange varieties. If we filter the sex on just males, we see mainly ...


2

I think you have an Indian Lily Moth (of the genus Polytela). It is considered a minor pest. Their habitat seems to only be around India and its surrounding area. Their worm matches yours ... smooth, dark, but red patches and white spots: If you dig in your garden, you may encounter these pupae: And they eventually grow into these beautifully-...


2

Looks like this species is Orthetrum triangulare commonly known as blue-tailed forest hawk. It is an Asian fresh water dragon fly species. As you mentioned that the dragonfly had a bluish hue, it became clear. The other one looks like Neurothemis ramburri, commonly known as red perch Reference Neurothemis is a genus of dragonflies in the family ...


2

Pterostigma is what those spots are. Wikipedia article is at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pterostigma. I read the summary of the technical article below. The pterostigma are heavier than the rest if the wing, and so the insect can glide faster without a destabilising flutter beginning. The author also believes that the pterostigma contribute to more ...


2

Those are likely moth eggs... moths have a tendency to attach their eggs on metal screens that you might have in your windows or doors. Here is a video of a moth laying eggs on glass: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2zf1J8CZdg Here is a video of a moth laying eggs on a metal screen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKHReVNAMYw Here are photos of eggs on a ...


2

After a bit of Googling I think I found it. It’s a pale tussock moth caterpillar. https://butterfly-conservation.org/moths/pale-tussock It says it irritates the skin and can cause a nasty rash so I’m staying away for now. I might risk moving it with a trowel and small tub though.


1

Firstly, those aren't bumblebee faces ... those are big fly eyes. Those are Bumblebee Hover Flies (Volucella bombylans): The noise in the first part of the video is identical to a fly flying around your head and the noise at the end sounds like what a fly would sound like when you press it against a surface like a wall or screen (or a newspaper, apparently)


1

I was able to find it in an insect lexicon. It is all in Japanese, but the description fits the image. The insect is in fact a カミキリ、a ホシべ二カミキリto be exact. And the binomial name is Eupromus ruber Here is also some more information https://www.insects.jp/kon-kamihosibeni.htm And a Wiki page in english https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eupromus_ruber


1

Prionus californicus would have been my guess due to the serrate antenna, Trichocnemis spiculatus are another large beetle without such saw-like antenna.


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