4

This looks like a lady beetle pupa. Given the appearance and your description of it's size, my guess would be of Harmonia axyridis. Here'a link, with a picture of another pupa about half way down the page: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/in361. This species has a diversity of colorations, both on the adults and the pupa. Here's an example of another ...


2

Features of a rotting insect carcass What you see after an insect dies is its chitinous exoskeleton. It is a tough biomaterial that takes time to decompose, given its structure, and few microbes can digest it, let alone as quickly as soft tissue. It's a little bit like human bones. The insect's inner soft parts will degrade quickly, just as with any dead, ...


2

Looks to me like the Longhorn beetle (Schizax senex), possibly a female, but it is hard to judge the length of the antennae. This beetle has long antennae (hence the longhorn name), with the male having antennae that are nearly twice as long as the female. S. senex is the only species of the genus. They are hirsute with a pale margin to the wing cases. The ...


2

It is most certainly a fly from Chironomidae, which belongs to the same suborder (Nematocera) as Mosquitoes (Culicidae). They have an overall resemblance to mosquitoes, but lack the large sucking mouthparts, and often have the large feathery antenna that are seen in your pictures. Some species are found in large swarms in early spring (but also later in the ...


1

I don't think it's reasonable to try to do this in a species-independent manner, since there is so much difference between ant species. Leaf-cutter ants, for example, will build trails to forage 200 meters away from their nests. Likewise, ants vary by two orders of magnitude in size and the walking speed of an ant will vary accordingly as well. Finally, I ...


1

These appear to be the nymphs of the red-shouldered bug (Jadera hematoloma), which eat the seeds of the Sapindaceae family (Soapberry family) throughout South America, Central America and the southern parts of North America. There is a close-up picture of one of these at bugguide.net, and further images here on the same website.


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