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7

(Note: I'm going to be using the British English "ladybird" instead of the US English "ladybug" in this answer.) This is a clearly a species of ladybird. Going by the number of spots, their size and not-perfectly-round shape, the positioning of the four central spots relative to the others, and the fact that its background colour isn't bright yellow... I'm ...


4

That is a parasitic wasp in the family, Ichneumonidae. You can tell by looking for a cell in the forewing that looks like a horse head. The "stinger" is an ovipositor. These wasps lay their eggs in the larvae of other insects


1

They look to me like cockroach nymphs (newly hatched cockroaches). Note the long antennae (more than body length) and the two short protuberances at the rear. Also note that bed bugs have a head distinct from the body, whereas cockroaches have a head that blends into the body. 3 mm cockroach nymph (from Wikipedia) A bed bug (from Wikipedia) See also this ...


1

I suspect this is a hemipteran, an assasin bug. I think this because of the shape of the legs, the reduced elytra and the bulgy eyes. If you had a picture from the side which would show the profile of the mouthparts, and if they happened to be protruding in the shape of a stylet, i'd be more confident that it is a type of assasin bug. Its definitely trying ...


1

I've been emailing some of the various researchers who worked on the papers I've cited. Jeremy Thomas and Judith Wardlaw both took time out of their (probably very busy!) schedules to reply, and they sent me very detailed replies as well as copies of papers I didn't have access to. Thanks to their replies, I'm in a position to post an answer to my own ...


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