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Corixidae (Water-boatmen). Aquatic insect comprising 6 subfamilies and 55 genera. (The Wikipedia page's right-hand panel contradicts the detail below that). Size 2 - 15 mm long (0.1 - 0.6 inches), six legs, the front pair are hairy and shaped like oars. Feeding on aquatic plants and algae they range worldwide except Antarctica. If I couldn't guess from the ...


5

It is a Crane fly (Tipulidae), which is a large, cosmopolitan family of flies in the order Diptera (true flies). There are about 15,000 species according to Wikipedia and some 500-odd genera. The crane flies are sometimes known as "daddy longlegs" though this name is more commonly associated with arachnids in the order Opiliones. Both the ...


2

Euploea Core. Pupates into common crow butterfly. (Aka. common Indian crow, common Australian crow, oleander butterfly (link to caterpillar)). A common butterfly with (according to Wikipedia) 15 subspecies identified, prevalent in south Asia, and Australia - the adult is distasteful to birds as the caterpillar feeds on latex-bearing plants. The exact mixture ...


2

Unfortunately an incomplete answer, hopefully others can add to this or fill out the details missing. After a bit of searching, I found the original reference: Plecoptera was named by Burmeister in 1939. I believe that this was a split of a previous clade, probably the Megaloptera. The book is available on Google books in the following link: Burmeister 1939 ...


2

It's a paper wasp; it looks like maybe a Northern Paper Wasp (better photo needed.) Northern Paper Wasps are most commonly found in the Midwest states. They are likely to build nests near humans as that is where a lot of wood can be found (homes, barns, sheds, fences, firewood, landscaping, etc.). The wasps use wood to create their nest. They are 15mm to ...


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