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2

These are not eggs, they are rose leaf galls caused by the spiny rose gall wasp (Diplolepis bicolor) larva that encases itself inside the gall and then matures and chews a hole in the gall to escape in spring, laying its eggs on a newly emerged leaf bud. The larvae generate the gall in the fresh leaves, perpetuating the cycle. Remove the galls in late summer ...


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That...looks like a brown recluse spider. The picture is a bit dark so I'm not 100% sure, but they can be identified by a violin-shaped marking on their back. Apparently they are very common in homes Kansas. Illinois Department of Public Health They are nocturnal: Brown recluse spiders are mostly nocturnal, coming out at night to hunt for their insect prey....


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In lieu of any better thoughts: Thrips (Thysanoptera). A large diverse group of tiny insects generally approximately 1 mm long. Well known for being invasive pests of many plant species, and being capable of transmitting a number of plant viruses. Which of the many species this would be, I don't know, but likely a common one like the Onion Thrips (Thrips ...


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Nezara viridula, Green Vegetable Bug (and other names). Probably fifth instar, as the body is mostly green. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nezara_viridula Found by searching images using the terms: green stink bug with four rows of yellow dots Photo by Charles Schurch Lewallen, under Creative Commons license. Found at https://bugguide.net/node/view/8819


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This is a planthopper nymph. These are a quite diverse group of insects found worldwide. Which one you have is open to further answers, and will be based on your locality and the species of plants and insects in that location. The furry "tail" and the fish-like mouth-parts/head give it away.


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