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This is a beetle from the family of the "longhorned beetles", since you found this beetle in India, I think this is Acanthophorus serraticornis See the images for comparision (from here and here): There is not much information online, but some can be found here and especially here in this scientific article. The larvae of this beetles are considered a ...


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At first, because of the size and shape, I thought that it was a horsefly, but no horsefly looks like that (at least not in Luxembourg). It turns out that it was a hoverfly, just as Karl Kjer said. The species is Volucella zonaria, or the hornet mimic hoverfly. This hoverfly lives in most of Europe (including Luxembourg) and is 15-25 mm in length, consistent ...


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It is Pneustocerus gravelyi, a species of stilt bug that lives in India. In both of these images, you can clearly see the the bright red coloration of the joint on each leg. The pronotum is also the exact same shape and color, and the bright red abdomen extends beyond the closed wings. original unmodified image source


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It appears to be a Tituria planata nymph. The adults look like this: At first I thought it was a treehopper, but it turns out that it was a leafhopper (they are similar but different). Tituria planata is one of the most common leafhopper species in Taiwan. https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=7887&taxon_id=49025&view=species Image ...


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This appears to be a bird mite (or possibly rat mite) in the genus Ornithonyssus of the parasitic family Macronyssidae. Credit: user Aewills on bugguide.com Distinguishing between species is difficult. In fact, according to idtools.org, identification of Mesostigmata to family or lower can usually only be accomplished only if the specimen is an adult ...


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This is a treehopper (an insect in the family Membracidae). As Arthur J Frost mentioned in his comment above, it will be difficult to ID this specimen more specifically given the angle, lack of further info, and my personal lack of knowledge of Indian fauna. However, you can view an at-least similar lookign species by viewing Oxyrachis tarandus, which is ...


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This looks like some kind of bagworm moth. Their larvae would use silk and plant debris to construct a protective case around themselves. It’s hard to tell the exact species unless you open up the case or wait for it to emerge as an adult moth. There are species on pretty much every continent and definitely some in Northern Italy. You can check out a list ...


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Based on the pattern of yellow spots it might be a Say Stink Bug. Check out this list of common Utah stinkbugs The 12 - 17 mm size is consistent with OP's description and the fact that this insect is often found on ornamental shrubbery is consistent with finding it in a garden.


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Based on the head morphology and the upper limb visible on the first picture, I would say it looks like a mantis. The length of the abdomen also confirms the same. The internet is also full of several non-scientific sources that seem to confirm they eat aphids. Animals will normally learn to avoid bitterness in food as it's a sign of toxicity. I haven't ...


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Spiders do curl up their legs when they die. Since they do not have muscles for extending the legs at their joints, they control the haemolymph pressure in the legs by using the blood pressure spike from their heartbeat to extend their legs out or walk. And with no heartbeat (when the spiders cease to exist), they curl up upon death. Source: http://www....


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This is actually not easy - for the first one I am sure that is a caterpillar from order Orgyia and the family Erebidae, but since there is a vast number of different caterpillars on all continents, I am not sure which one it is exactly. If you look at this image (from here), you will see a striking resemblance: A lot more information on these moths can be ...


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This is the nymph stage of a planthopper, an insect in a suborder of the hemipterans. The "fiber-optic-like" tail is actually made out of wax! From Wikipedia Nymphs of many [planthoppers] produce wax from special glands on the abdominal terga and other parts of the body. These are hydrophobic and help conceal the insects. Adult females of many families ...


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