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Beekeeping in urban areas often require that beekeepers supplement their colonies with feed since urban areas have, on average, very little forage available to sustain a colony year-round. There are usually very little in terms of wildlife (or wild pollinators) when it comes to urban settings. In contrast, suburban areas would have more to offer as there are ...


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That hoverfly was probably feeding on red pollen from flowers. Many types of flowers have red pollen: They were scientifically proven to eat pollen and nectar as early as 1883, when Muller disected the flies up to study their crop and insides. Entomology Division, Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Private Bag, Auckland, New Zealand Analyses ...


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I'm converting my numerous comments into an "answer" -- I don't currently know the exact species, but I can at least explain some of my thoughts more completely. Your specimen looks a lot like Gonatista grisea, a tree mantis that mimics a lichen -- as you mention in your post. However, G. grisea, is native to the southeastern USA. I could find no ...


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Smithsonian mag says that the bee stings can't penetrate through the predator hornet's armor, which is simply a case of the hornet's armor being tougher than the blunt barb of the bee sting. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/invasion-murder-hornets-180974809/ Here's a good research:" To examine their behaviors of penetrating into different ...


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