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A critical point is that mosquitoes and ticks inject saliva into their host, not the contents of their stomach. Arboviruses, including dengue and West Nile virus, are injected into vertebrates within mosquito saliva during mosquito feeding. Mosquito saliva contains anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory molecules that facilitate the ...


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Diseases that are spread by arthropods (I'm including things like ticks here as well as insects) are generally highly adapted for that lifestyle, and there are many specific adaptations that are needed to make this efficient. They're not simply passively carried by the arthropod; they actually replicate in the arthropod as well as in their vertebrate host, ...


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Lacy phacelia or purple tansy (Phacelia tanacetifolia), which can be planted any time of year due to its short growing season. After flowering, it is plowed into the ground to enrich the soil with humus All types of clovers: excellent nectar plants that plowed after flowering and enrich the soil with nitrogen, or scythe them and use as feed for animals ...


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Sorry for the late response.... I think the short answer is Game Theory. Obviously any colour scheme could in principle be used to signal toxicity. However, if a scheme was chosen that did not stand out it would not be an Evolutionary Stable Strategy (ESS). Let's take an example. Suppose a poisonous insect was coloured with green and brown markings. ...


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This is a cockroach. Although about 30 species typically associate with humans and human habitats [source], the only ones that I know that have strong parallel dark lines running in the rostral/caudal direction are the Asian cockroach (Blattella asahinai) and the German cockroach (Blattella germanica). According to Wikipedia, these 2 species appear very ...


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heres a link that can guide you: https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef017 I now also asked my father, who is a veterinarian. He told me that this is not a maggot or a larva that could harm the cat. He also said that the only larva possible would be from flea, those are much smaller though. So it is most probably a larva from an insect or caterpillar.


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Found it! Seems to actually be the pupae phase of the common drain fly - psychoda spp. Looks like I'm going to be routing or replacing the pipes in that house. Thanks.


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It is a Madagascar hissing cockroach. They are native to Africa, particularly Madagascar. In the U.S. these roaches only invade homes when accidentally brought in via imported furniture or food, although some people do keep them as pets. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madagascar_hissing_cockroach


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Those are springtails, order Collembola. Looks like they are in the family Entomobryidae. They are completely harmless. They don't bite, or spread disease. They often find their way into potted plants in people's homes. I'm not surprised that they are in your sink. Their small size makes them subject to desiccation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springtail ...


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https://www.prairienursery.com/resources-and-guides/plants-and-gardening/planting-for-pollinators.php This link should answer your doubts concerning such plants. Asking for a list concerning whole Europe feels something a little bit out of reach considering how diverse the environment is there, this link concerns mainly the UK, albeit you have to consider ...


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