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Temporal kinetics does not refer to the kinetics of kinase phosphorylation reactions and, since it is not standard terminology, you likely wouldn’t find its meaning in any textbook. The authors of the paper quoted in the question use the phrase temporal kinetics to describe the phosphorylation state of a proteome-wide selection of kinase substrates (ie ...


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Acetylcholinesterase. Chosen because the esterase seems like a low energy reaction so it wouldn't need energetic co-factors. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetylcholinesterase Not sure if I should do a new answer or not.


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It is not a specific unit of kinase activity, rather a general approach taken for following reactions where there is no change of colour. The abbreviation cpm stands for counts per minute and is a measure of radioactivity. In this particular example a radioactive phosphate has been incorporated in the ATP of the protein kinase assay. If the protein kinase is ...


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Disclaimer This answer is a conceptual explanation, as appears to be the request, rather than a repetition of the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten equation, which I feel inappropriate, partly because it can be found elsewhere, e.g. in Wikipedia and Berg et al.. I appreciate that, like the derivations on which it is based, some of its assumptions do not ...


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This question really boils down to semantics, and the definition can be clarified by discussing enzyme regulation in general. The 3 main ways that enzymes can be inhibited are through the following mechanisms: competitive inhibition, non-competitive inhibition, and uncompetitive inhibition. In competitive inhibition, the inhibitor binds directly to the ...


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If there is a way to: Make the replication of a common culture organism (e.g. E. coli) dependent upon the inhibitor or substrate of interest, possibly with a restrictive media. Express the enzyme of interest in a relatively controlled manner in such organism (e.g. well caracterized promoter in plasmid with well characterized copy number), Then you can get ...


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Short answer It all depends on how you look at $k_\text{cat}$ and enzyme concentrations Long answer The effect of an uncompetitive inhibitor on $k_\text{cat}$ can be interpreted in two ways. Interpretation 1: This is followed in the lecture series mentioned in the question. See the video https://youtu.be/rNBEUGYu034 from 7:37 to 11:01 minutes. The ...


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Hi again TheLast Cipher, Enzymes in a cell are usually semi-quantified by the: Western Blot technique. But there are lesser known techniques. E.g. For a Western Blot the unit of measurement is the color intensity of the enzyme band on the blot membrane. If I were you I would look for journal articles covering your pathway of interest. E.g. https://iubmb....


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Enzymes are catalysts that lower a reactions activation energy (Ea), and thus increases the rate of the reaction. The diagram above is a Gibbs-Free energy landscape/pathway, where the top of the diagram is the transition state between the substrate and the product. Enzymes speed up chemical reactions by stabilising the transition state, and in effect, lowers ...


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