4

A methylated nucleotide is the same nucleotide, for the purposes of base-pairing events. The methylated base will be paired with its Watson-Crick opposite after replication, for instance (and methylation will even persist after replication).


4

First, let me qualify the idea of "problematic" epigenetic modifications by saying that the impact of a modification on an organism is often dependent on the environment. That is to say that outcome is dependent on the interaction of genetics (or epigenetics) and the environment in which the associated genes are expressed; e.g. a mutation or modification ...


3

Starting from what appears to be your main question: Can I use SNPs associated with a gene's higher expression to compute the likelihood of that gene being expressed in the brain region? I would strongly advise against using SNPs determine if genes are expressed (at all) in a given tissue.For one thing SNPs that affect expression (then often called eQTLs)...


2

I don't think there is an obvious contradiction here. (1) Mapping neuronal function to the perception of threat (or emotions in general) is often advertised as well-understood, but in fact it is not. Serotonin-concentration-based models (such as the monoaminergic theory of depression) are unavoidably imprecise because ”the brain is not soup”. Additionally, ...


1

The Methylation will change the individual nucleotide(s) and persist after replication. However the order of the base pairs does not change, so the information in the DNA will still remain , and the base pairs remain with their same partners.For an analogy consider a hardcover book as the DNA . Then the author of the book signs the cover. The signature is ...


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