8 votes
Accepted

Are 'homeothermic' and 'endothermic' synonymous?

[D]o homeothermic and poikilothermic have the same meaning as endothermic and ectothermic respectively[?] No. Once you are referring to the source of the heat, while the other time you are referring ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.1k
8 votes

Why is the opposite of plantar flexion called "dorsiflexion"?

Although the other 2 answers are accurate and well thought out, I just wanted to answer this with a bit different focused response. Two things to note: In general, one should think of flexion as ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

When is an anatomic entity named "laterale" vs. "lateralis"?

This is actually much more of a lesson in Latin linguistics/grammar. The root, Lateral, comes ultimately from latus meaning “side" or "flank” in Latin. [Source]. By adding one of these ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

What is the thinking behind the naming of arachidonic acid?

There are finitely many letters and possible combinations of them making words, and many many things to be named. Inevitably, some of the words will be similar or even homonyms. To me, having some ...
Domen's user avatar
  • 1,932
7 votes
Accepted

Coracoid vs. Coronoid - Etymology/Naming Choice?

It appears that both naming conventions originate with Galen, the Greek physician, almost 2000 years ago (for example, see: Singer, 1952). Although the precise motivations behind the naming ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 45.7k
7 votes

True anatomical/physiological explanation for "metaphysis" etymology

meta-: word-forming element of Greek origin meaning 1. "after, behind; among, between," 2. "changed, altered," 3. "higher, beyond;" from Greek meta (prep.) "in the midst of; in common with; by ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 8,079
6 votes
Accepted

What does the species name 'fistula' mean?

The botanic and medical term fistula is directly derived from the latin word fistula meaning tube or pipe. Both the medical fistula and the fruits of the Cassia fistula tree show phenotypes similar ...
skymningen's user avatar
  • 1,961
5 votes

Does the palate truly house the sense of taste?

Although @MattDMo's post rightfully suggests that gustatory senses are achieved primarily by lingual taste buds and olfactory nerves, he has actually missed that there ARE in-fact palatal taste buds. ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Are there any anatomy books focusing on etymology?

Though a little bit outdated looking this from the university of Sydney is pretty good and searchable. I find it pretty useful for aiding memorisation or just a quick entertaining read. Arnold's ...
Benedict Claxton Stevens's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why are the posterior and anterior inferior temporal cortex called area TEO and area TE respectively?

These are very old names for primate cortical areas, originally from the anatomist Constantin von Economo and also used by von Bonin and Bailey (1947) (where the TEO region name seems to originate). ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 45.7k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the reason behind the subphylum name "Urochordata" for tunicates?

In 1877, Lankester proposed in "Notes on the Embryology and Classification of the Animal Kingdom" division of the group we now call Chordata into three parts: Urochorda Cephalochorda Craniata which ...
mgkrebbs's user avatar
  • 9,054
4 votes
Accepted

Is there a nomenclature for human physiology?

Des Moines University has an overview of medical terminology, for example: Useful prefixes and suffixes Word roots for organs Some general terms System-specific terms, for example, for circulatory ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 8,079
4 votes

For which wing characteristic are Plecoptera (stoneflies) named for?

Unfortunately an incomplete answer, hopefully others can add to this or fill out the details missing. After a bit of searching, I found the original reference: Plecoptera was named by Burmeister in ...
bob1's user avatar
  • 12.1k
3 votes

What is the etymology of "moura" in Mourasuchus?

The original description of the species was given in 1964 by Llewellyn Ivor Price in: Price, L. I. (1964). "Sôbre o crânio de um grande crocodilídeo extinto do alto Rio Juruá, Estado do Acre". An. ...
brazofuerte's user avatar
  • 1,582
3 votes
Accepted

Etymology of vimentin

According to this paper: From the Latin word vimentum, used to describe arrays of flexible rods,both ordered ones (e.g.,latices,filigres,and wicker-work) and non-ordered ones (e.g.,brushwood). ...
JM97's user avatar
  • 4,796
3 votes
Accepted

Why is the prefrontal cortex called such?

The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a part of the frontal lobe (Fig. 1). Lobe means [A part] demarcated from the rest of the organ by a fissure (crack), sulcus (groove), connective tissue or simply by ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 52.4k
3 votes

Etymology of PAX proteins

In addition to the other answer, the following is some historical context on the naming of these genes. 1980 October: Discovery of pair-rule genes in Drosophila. Nusslein-Volhard C, Wieschaus E. ...
canadianer's user avatar
  • 17.7k
3 votes
Accepted

Etymology of PAX proteins

According to InterPro, a paired domain is a DNA-binding element consisting of paired N-terminal and C-terminal subdomains, separated by a linker. PAX proteins follow this motif, and as such typically ...
CKM's user avatar
  • 8,109
3 votes

What is the origin of the name "λ phage"?

The original paper from Lederberg from January 1953 (see reference 1) indeed doesn't mention the origin of the name, but the paper in reference 2 does. It says: The isolation of λ was first ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 51.6k
2 votes

Anemiaceae etymology

That one is Greek origin from aneimon or "naked, unclad, without clothing" which is to refer to the panicles of the sporangia.
CKM's user avatar
  • 8,109
2 votes

Etymology of the term monilophyte

Monilophytes = Leptosporangiate ferns, horsetails, whisk ferns, marattioid ferns, & ophioglossoid ferns. According to A Dictionary of Entomology: Latin, monil = necklace As for "phyte,"...
theforestecologist's user avatar
2 votes

Etymology of the term monilophyte

Phylogeny and evolution of ferns (monilophytes) with a focus on the early leptosporangiate divergences: The monilophytes (= Infradivision Moniliformopses, sensu Kenrick and Crane, 1997⇓) share a ...
CKM's user avatar
  • 8,109
2 votes

Why is the opposite of plantar flexion called "dorsiflexion"?

In the same vein, why is the top surface of the foot called the "dorsal surface?" I don't think the above answers are correct -- they do not really address the question of why the top of the foot is ...
D. Zhu's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Why is the prefrontal cortex called such?

I think the term pre-frontal does not mean anatomically in the front of the frontal lobe of the brain. This is regarded to the history of discovered area , that the choice of the term was based on the ...
Akram Qaasim's user avatar
2 votes

Exact meaning of the term "clutch"

A clutch usually refers to all the eggs for a single reproductive event or laying or location. It can mean either all those laid by one organisms in one event or all those laid in a population in a ...
John's user avatar
  • 14.7k
2 votes

Why are hydathodes called hydathodes and not hydrothodes?

Dictionaries are your friend. American heritage says "Greek hudōr, hudat-, water; see wed-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + hodos, way, road." Merriam-Webster says "International Scientific ...
mgkrebbs's user avatar
  • 9,054
2 votes
Accepted

What is the etymology for Pinus halepensis?

If you search for this plant (properly spelled Pinus Halepensis) in the International Plant Names Index (IPNI), you'll find this page providing publication reference for this species of pine: ...
theforestecologist's user avatar

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