7 votes
Accepted

Why do mitochondria have a phospholipid bilayer?

I think the question is based on a false premise: Poster: Now, mitochondria are said to have been archaea, right? Me: Wrong, I’m afraid. The closest bacterial relation of mitochondria is ...
David's user avatar
  • 25.7k
5 votes

Haploid eukaryotes?

Some apicomplexans such as Plasmodium spp. are haploid during their asexual stages. The organism spends more time (at least in the human host) in the asexual stage than sexual. source Plasmodium ...
Amar's user avatar
  • 151
4 votes

How much DNA do humans have?

Answer to the question How much DNA is there in our cell nuclei? In humans, there are about 6 billion base pairs in the nucleus of each cell. Why 6 billions and not 3? There are 3 billions base pairs ...
Remi.b's user avatar
  • 68.1k
2 votes
Accepted

What are chiasmata?

We need to make a distinction between the genetic map of a chromosome, which is usually built up from meiotic recombination frequencies between linked genetic markers, the physical map of a chromosome,...
mdperry's user avatar
  • 3,517
2 votes
Accepted

Why are plant cells rectangular and animal cells spherical shaped?

Animal cells Generally all (animal) cells have different shapes because they do different things. Each cell type has a specific role which it has to play in order to assist the body in working ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
  • 2,603
2 votes
Accepted

Why is translation so much faster in prokaryotes than eukaryotes?

Unless the poster can cite more recent papers to support the assertion regarding a difference in rates of prokaryotic and eukaryotic protein synthesis, I would say that this is incorrect. Lacroute ...
David's user avatar
  • 25.7k
2 votes
Accepted

How do you differenciate between the eukaryotes and prokaryotes?

There are lots of ways to distinguish between eukaryotes and prokaryotes, as listed by microbiologynotes.com: ...
rotaredom's user avatar
  • 2,711
2 votes

What happens to embedded membrane proteins after a vesicle is formed?

Endosome formation. For the sake of keeping this somewhat brief, I'm going to stay somewhat surface level. When a vesicle is endocytosed, it is called a primary endocytic vesicle. When multiple ...
Science Is Golden's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How long does each of the stages in meiosis take?

If you take a look at the figure directly above the image you posted in the link you posted, you'll see a very different set of figures. It turns out, time spent in different phases of the cell ...
De Novo's user avatar
  • 8,791
2 votes
Accepted

Why is a cell in anaphase (without a nuclear envelope) be considered as a eukaryotic cell?

It is still considered a Eukaryotic cell because the daughter cells and mother cell are both Eukaryotic; the chromosomes will condense and be contained in a Nucleus after Telophase and Cytokinesis. ...
Yashas Ravi's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What happens if a lysosome is pierced and it's enzymes are made to get released

Enzymes of lysosome are usually inactive and are activated only in low pH environments, so I guess, randomly puncturing a lysosome wouldn't affect the cell to any serious extent unless the cell is an ...
Moist CottonCandy's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Are all unicellular eukaryotic organisms protists?

Two other kingdoms contain unicellular organisms. Some fungi, such as yeasts are unicellular. Many algal (Plantae) species are unicellular, including the spectacular Valonia ventricosa, which is up to ...
bob1's user avatar
  • 12.1k
1 vote
Accepted

What is bacterial (prokaryotic) cell division called?

Fission, binary fission, cell division: these are all used more or less as synonyms for prokaryotes. "Fission" and "cell division" are more general, because they include mechanisms ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 45.7k
1 vote

Why are Chromosome Territories important?

First, this idea was discredited or ignored during several decades, some studies suggest that CT is random in some eukaryotes that isn't necessary the truth. It is not easy at all to determine is CT ...
Hachiloni's user avatar
  • 973
1 vote

In plant cells, is water stored only in the vacuole?

One of the properties of "storoge" is that in can be filled or empied when needed. Contents of cytoplasm and all organelles are aqueous solutions so all of them contain quite some water. ...
BagiM's user avatar
  • 583
1 vote

Do larger unicellular eukaryotic organisms have larger organelles?

The cell has the amount of organelles necessary to perform its function. If a cell requires a lot of protein, it must have multiple nuclei to produce this protein. If the cell performs many activities ...
Nataly Sobrinho's user avatar
1 vote

Is this sentence about RER correct on Wikipedia?

As stated in a comment, your understanding of protein translation in eukaryotes is not accurate. In order to provide a concrete reference that isn't wikipedia, I'll quote here from Biochemistry (2nd ...
bjarchi's user avatar
  • 115
1 vote

Did Plant Cells Evolve from Animal, Protist, or Fungal Cells?

Plants were almost always considered a separate group from fungi and animals. As per the latest classification both animals and plants are included in the clade Opisthokonta: animals and related ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
  • 35.6k
1 vote

DNA replication - how many times and when does it occur?

This sounds like a difference in perspective of when exactly cells "die". If you consider that, in a cell division, a mother cell "gives birth" to two daughter cells, you could argue that the mother ...
jfaccioni's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

L-selectin in white blood cells

Fighting of harmful microbes (and not antigens per se, although specific antigenic recognition is important), involves a lot of processes which require several lignad-binding molecules and ligands on ...
stochastic13's user avatar
  • 4,689
1 vote
Accepted

How Mitochondria differs from Prokaryotes(probably regarding energy production)?

If you mean "why do we have mitochondria instead of our cells doing the work themselves" Then I can think of several answers. First, oxidative phosphorylation must take place within an organelle, and ...
4D Neuron's user avatar
  • 360
1 vote

What is the function of multiple nuclei in syncytial cells?

A mononucleate's size is limited by its nucleocytoplasmic ratio, and protozoa like being big. The solution? Multiple copies of the same genes in huge nuclei, or multiple individual nuclei. Multiple ...
forest's user avatar
  • 297
1 vote

How does repair take place on leading strand in eukaryotes?

I'll keep the answer to this as concise as possible. The major mismatch repair (MMR) pathway used by eukaryotes is the MutS$\alpha$-MutL$\alpha$-dependent MMR. See the diagram below for its mechanism: ...
another 'Homo sapien''s user avatar
1 vote

Did the Great Oxygenation Event also cause a mass extinction?

The proposed mass extinction due to Great Oxidation Event is actually an elucidation by scientists. After reading many articles online, although there are evidences of GOE, every article states the ...
Imtiaz Raqib's user avatar
  • 1,278
1 vote

Why did eukaryotic cells develop?

As far as I understand your question, the "development" of eukaryotic cells can be linked to the endosymbiotic theory Symbiogenesis. This diagram only depicts a possible trajectory of evolution ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
  • 2,603
1 vote

What determines whether the maternal or paternal allele is expressed?

Answer is yes. The term you are look for is parental imprinting http://mcb.berkeley.edu/courses/mcb142/lecture%20topics/Amacher/LECTURE_13_Imprinting_F08.pdf Take the insulin-like growth factor 2 (...
JayCkat's user avatar
  • 2,926
1 vote

What metabolically happens when an egg fuses with the nucleus of a somatic cell

Somatic cell nuclear transfer is a method for creating a viable embryo from a somatic cell and egg cell. A somatic nucleus is inserted into an enucleated egg, where the somatic nucleus is reprogrammed ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 714

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