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Here are a few examples. All are open to debate as to whether it answers your question. Zoophilia in humans When asking of example of a "species" that does something, it is easy to forget about the diversity of behaviours among individuals of that species. It raises the question of how frequent must the behaviour be in that species to accept that the ...


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More details to support @SPr's answer, from the abstract of Plavcan (2012): "Sexual Size Dimorphism, Canine Dimorphism, and Male-Male Competition in Primates: Where Do Humans Fit In?" While dimorphism in primates is associated with agonistic male mate competition, a variety of factors can affect male and female size, and thereby dimorphism. The causes of ...


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The Answer It is correct that the product of the conceptual translation of a nucleotide sequence into an amino acid sequence results in the loss of certain information present in the former. An obvious example is that the amino acid sequences of the same protein in two individuals may be identical, but there may be silent mutations in the DNA, and these can ...


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Each has its own utility, depending on the time-frame you are looking at. For evolutionary studies, you need variation, but not so much variation that one substitution at the same position overwrites a previous substitution. So if you are looking at deep splits, over hundreds of millions of years, it may be that amino acids are more reliable. But you are ...


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I've not read it but this SE question Why don't mammals have more than 4 limbs? though not a duplicate (it asks about mammals not all vertebrates) may have some elements in its answers pertinent to your question. And the question Why are there no vertebrates with more than four limbs? has been asked in Quora where it has 7 answers you may find useful. ...


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You're asking if cells arose with 100% replication accuracy and if lower accuracy was selected for under a feedback loop. Maybe there was a sweet spot for DNA replication accuracy in terms of efficiency, but it's highly unlikely that our ancestor cells had 100% fidelity in DNA replication because if we look at yeast for example, there are many genes ...


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There is previous research for that field of macroevolution.... Horse shoe crabs change slowly and tropical fish change fast. You are right, it's not just random variation, it's fine tuned by DNA transcription processes which are too developed to be random, so the complexity of the processes leads scientists to think "WTF" regarding epigenetics, ...


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DNA misreplication events can lead to accidental duplication of DNA (even the entire genome), misalignements in recomibination events, integration of DNA from extracellular sources e.g. viruses. All these events can lead to large scale changes in the genome size of an organisms, smaller scale changes can be insertions and deletions in the DNA from repair ...


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In short, no evolution is not a result of variation. Evolution is a process in which each population in a system compete for a limited number of resources and each population has a fitness score (how well suited for the environment they are, this score is a man made concept to help illustrate the point), the populations with a higher fitness score tend to ...


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Bilateria, as a clade (all animals, excluding sponges, cnidaria, comb-jellies, and placozoans) is monophyletic, and as such, originated from a single species that was bilaterally symmetrical. Sometimes the explanation for a particular trait involves ancestry, and if an innovation is advantageous, it tends to spread. Along with this group came advances in the ...


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