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9

This is at best anecdotal evidence. First of all, urine is, although it has been thought otherwise for decades, not sterile. The bacteria in it just don't grow under the conditions used in the lab which are used to proof bladder infections. See these two articles: Evidence of uncultivated bacteria in the adult female bladder. Urine is not sterile: use of ...


8

The comment of the poster to my request for clarification cites “The formation of ammonia itself requires… large quantities of water to dilute it out of a biological system” I conclude that he assumes that the problem with animals eliminating ammonia as such is one of solubility in water. This is not the case. The solubility of ammonia is such that saturated ...


6

Urine is contaminated with skin bacteria and possibly something excreted from your blood. A very tiny fraction of urine is microbial. Feces is basically a solid mass of undigested food, gut bacteria, and their byproducts. Many gut bacteria in particular have evolved in the conditions the human body produces so many can survive well in human tissue. about 30%...


6

Many gut microbes are pathobionts or opportunistic pathogens — these organisms can be part of the normal gut flora (microbiome) of healthy individuals, but under the right (for them) circumstances (e.g.s: when introduced into the bloodstream by a cut, or due to immunosuppression) they can cause disease.1,2 As for urine, there are many fewer microbes present ...


6

I cannot find any definite articles on why there would be a reason for this behaviour other than the same ones that you have mentioned in your article. It could be because it wants to mark its territory or the dog wants to hide its scent. One point that I would also like to add is force of habit. As Charles Darwin (the father of evolutionary biology) had ...


5

The premise of the question is incorrect. Mammalian organisms do recycle nitrogen. They only excrete excess nitrogen. Ammonia from deamination of amino acids can be incorporated into glutamate and glutamine: Transamination can then transfer the amino group from glutamate, for example, to other ketoacids for the synthesis of other amino acids. The capacity ...


5

Short answer: This is because the most common form of nitrogen found in multicellular organisms (not incorporated into any other compound) i.e. ammonia is too toxic to be stored or recycled. Background: Ammonia, the product of deamination of amino acids, is basic in nature ($NH_3~+~H_2O \rightarrow NH_4OH \rightleftharpoons NH_4^+ + OH^-$) and thus disturbs ...


5

The kidney is essentially a filter which extracts dissolved waste products & water from the blood. It basically allows only molecular-sized things to pass, otherwise it would continually leak blood cells. The digestive tract OTOH is basically a tube. Stuff gets mashed up at one end and ejected at the other. Even fairly large objects can pass through ...


3

Tl;DR: Urea is a metabolic waste excreted from human body. As such it does not have any function in human body. It is a major product in the waste excreted from kidneys although trace amounts can be found in sweat. The concentration of urea increases when kidneys fails to function normally. Hence, they are excreted through sweat glands, observed as "...


3

I can only speak to what I am familiar with, but I would assume that the large majority of those viruses are bacteriophages. These bacteriophages, or "phages" for short, are viruses that infect bacteria. I should mention that these phages are not human pathogens though. When we go out into the field to discover novel phages, we often go to wastewater ...


2

Here is a book about dry-matter production of urine treated plants. If we consider that trees are large plants, it's fair to apply the study to trees too: The findings of the study suggested that urine and urine products are equally as effective as mineral fertilizer especially in sandy soil and that splitting the application is a useful strategy to manage ...


2

You can see a similar pile of bird poop seen below a barn swallow nest: Source: deepmuckbigrake Alternatively, if it really did appear overnight, perhaps a pile pf pigeon poop was pushed out of a nesting area in the soffit? Source: Scranton Times Tribune If it's pigeon poop, you might want to be careful.


1

Speaking specifically about blueberry bushes as a perhaps extreme example, they thrive in acidic soil and nitrogen-laden soil. However, dog urine is bad for blueberries, as the high nitrogen content overwhelms the plant and damages fruit production. Dog urine is only slightly acidic (pH 6-6.5) and can often be alkaline, which also changes the soil acidity in ...


1

Interesting question anomdsgf. There are substances present in Bos taurus urine that promote antimicrobial activity. Studies like this and this have shown how the urine can inhibit the growth of certain bacterial strains. However, with all that said, Bos taurus urine could still contain other harmful bacteria that are not inhibited simply because it was ...


1

I don't think it is an adaption, but the that diet plays a dominant role. The feces of cows in intensively fertilized agricultural fields, with grasses rich in protein, has no shape at all. See picture below. The feces of cows in natural areas has much more structure. (image has copyright, so can only link)


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