Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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When I visited the Cheetah Outreach Center in South Africa, the guides there told us that their captive cheetahs couldn't run nearly as fast as wild ones, and that wild ones were much more muscular than the ones in the center; their point was that actually having to run full-out or starve caused much more rigorous training than occasionally jogging after a ...


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Can animals train to be noticeably stronger, faster, more agile.. than other animals of the same species? Yes, of course! Humans are animals, so yes! But even in non-human animals. You can look for example in a tutorial on how to train a dog (or a horse) for specific skills (speed, high jump, long jump, etc...). It seems that variation in animals is ...


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Apparently you can sweat even in a cold enough room, without even doing exercise! The main causes of sweating include, among exercise and high body temperature, stress and anxiety. This condition is called cold sweating. See this article: The body normally produces sweat as a way to help keep cool. Sweating normally occurs with exertion such as when ...


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It should be noted that in some people (somewhere between 1% and 3% of the population, depending on who's counting) there is another mechanism for delayed muscle pain. Myoadenylate Deaminase Deficiency (MADD) is a genetic condition whose primary symptom is pain and cramping with an onset about 36 hours after moderately intense exercise. The pain often ...


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Taking cold showers(10-15 ℃) after training or workout have many benefits: It helps in lowering the damaged tissues temperature by constricting blood vessels. Cold helps numb nerve endings which provides instant localised pain relief. Brings down heart rate and increases circulation. It minimises inflammation and help you recover faster. It is more ...


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From the perspective of sympathetic nervous system Exercise induced adaptations of heart A common phenomenon in endurance athletes is the athlete's heart /athletic heart syndrome Once athletes stop training, the heart returns to its normal size. You must understand why this type of adaptation is happening in them: Firstly the athletes train to ...


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Definitely when it comes to horses. They are selectively bred for generations to work in different sports: dressage, show jumping, endurance, racing and so on. As one example: to train a horse for olympic level dressage takes ten years or more in order to build muscles and coordination. Some example of horse sports, several of them describes how horses are ...


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A few explanations at the cellular and molecular level: First, for contraction to happen, muscles need signals from nerves. Replenishing the pool of neurotransmitters (used for each synaptic burst) takes a bit of time, and short-term exhaustion may happen at this level. In the muscle cells, contraction is caused by a calcium release within the cell, from ...


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Contraction of muscles presses on the veins and increases venous pressure, which increases blood return to the heart and therefore increases cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism. Importantly, the total volume of blood in the body does not change by this mechanism, though the amount in the arteries can increase because there is less blood in the ...


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Vigorous exercise (even for five minutes) causes increased DNA damage http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20839226. The increased DNA damage would stimulate the defenses including the immune system (e.g. natural killer cells) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16618710, and the boosted immune system would eliminate cancer cells, reducing cancers based on the ...


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I think you refer to the Muscle fatigue: A state of exhaustion or loss of strength and/or muscle endurance following strenuous activity associated with the accumulation of lactic acid in muscles. (Source) So yeah, you're right about the lactic acid overproduction :) How Muscle Fatigue Works ? During short term (anaerobic) exercise, ATP and creatine ...


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No The amount of calories the brain consumes is basically the same whether it is doing anything or no. Best case only about 3% increase in calories consumed by the brain or about 50 calories per day, which is miniscule and most studies do not even show that much. Additionally buring calories is only important for weight loss once consumption is controlled. ...


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Wild animals may have less variation in traits such as speed of running, if they predominantly eat similar diets, and if the slow ones are regularly getting eaten and failing to breed. Wild animals likely run at around the optimal speed for their environment. The process of training implies some level of domestication - humans protecting the animals, ...


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As jamesqf points out in comment, "the less we use it the longer it lasts" isn't always true even of machines. Sometimes if a machine isn't used, the moving parts start sticking together through rust or other decay processes, which does not happen when the machine is used and the moving parts move regularly against each other. Another example that comes ...


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There doesn't seem to be anything wrong with the paper, but as pointed out in the comments (and in the press release itself), the study was small, so any conclusions should probably be tentative. Adding a little more detail from the link: For the study, which was very small, researchers recruited nine young males and 9 females, all roughly in their mid-...


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I think there might be some missing context here leading to confusion of which muscles are being referred to in that passage. During exercise, blood flow increases in active muscle due to local vasodilation. Cardiac output also increases, which ensures that total blood flow in the body is sufficient to meet the increased demand. At higher levels of ...


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this depends on largely how you define it, what we normally measure is efficiency including how much energy is used on metabolic upkeep and heating the body in addition to muscle output. we use oxygen consumption to know exactly how many calories we have "burned" when doing this. In this study we get between 18-26% efficiency, thats calories ingested to ...


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I have an answer, but it is not ideal because science's current understanding of the answer to your question is somewhat limited. The detrimental influence of physiological stress upon the heart is thought to occur because the physiological stress causes the cardiovascular system to prepare to meet anticipated energy needs by 1) increasing pulse and blood ...


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I would guess that pulse pressure increases after exercise. As I understand it, Systolic pressure is simply resistance against the pressure wave of the ejected blood. Since the stroke volume is increased in exercise to deliver more blood, systolic pressure will be definitely be increased. During diastole, the major resistance to flow is due to peripheral ...


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Short Answer Probably not. Slightly longer answer This fairly recent review shows little positive effect of standing desks and mixed results of treadmill desks for cognitive outcomes (note: this is a summary of 23 full studies). Only treadmill desks were actually studied for cognitive performance, and even those showed no effects. There were some ...


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