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30

Short answer It is believed that low water levels occurring several times during the last ten million years facilitated migration and divergent evolution of the felids. The North-American ocelot, lynx, puma, leopard cat, and domestic cat are believed to have evolved from a common ancestor that crossed the Bering land bridge between 5 to 9 million years ago ...


20

In order to form a hybrid, substantial genetic similarity between the organisms is required. To understand why, the successful formation of a zygote from the gametes of the two parents (i.e. fertilisation) in higher animals like mammals requires that the genomes of the organisms be reasonably similar (or homologous; see for instance human fertilisation). ...


15

Short answer Spectral sensitivity of cats indeed ventures into the UV, but not beyond ~320 nm. Their maximum is likely similar to ours, i.e., ~750 nm. Background The spectral sensitivity of blue cones (photoreceptors detecting low wavelengths) of many species, including humans and cats, extends into the UV range (Fig. 1). Fig. 1. Human cone absorption ...


13

This is not a direct answer to your question, but I want to point out that your basic premise is partially incorrect. Other felines also form social groups. For instance, male cheetahs form coalitions (also see Cheetah outreach at http://www.cheetah.co.za/c_info.html), often for life, which generally makes them more successful in defending territories. ...


8

It is explained with path integration in behavioral neuroscience. Not only cats, but other mammals, birds and even insects use path integration to return to a starting point. Here is a relevant excerpt from the book Beyond the Cognitive Map: From Place Cells to Episodic Memory (by A. David Redish): Path integration is the ability to return directly to a ...


6

Cuteness is a subjective term to designate a psychological response to neotenic features (i.e. features that delay or slow in their growth) of the body mostly associated with young animals. These are features where the body parts are proportionally exaggerated compared to other body parts and the adult stage. It make the young individual attractive to the ...


6

I think you are misunderstanding "color" here. When applied to cats, it doesn't literally mean a color shade as used in color theory, but "coat color" which can in fact also be a "coat pattern". The cats above are two-colored, not three-colored. One color is white. The other color is what is called "tabby" in English and is a pattern of dark spots arranged ...


5

They have different vocal cords, differently-shaped pharynx. I would imagine that is all that explains the difference in sound. As to mewing versus roaring, the vocalizations you reference are not applied to similar sithations. I wonder if there are videos of baby lions mewing or making similar sounds to get their monther's attention?


5

Animal Planet is quoting researcher Dennis C. Turner who claims this is an instinct which is supposed to tire the prey: Cats, rather, wear down prey to avoid sustaining injuries. They're motivated by self-preservation, just like most other animals, and they know what could happen if they aren't careful. Mice and rats, for example, can deliver nasty bites ...


3

The carnivora can be seen in this phylogeny tree which comprises most of today's mammals. They suggest that rodents, elephants, monkeys, dogs and sea mammals all diverged from about 30 million years before the asteroid, until 5 million years after. The placentals and marsupials had a common ancestor previous to 100 million years ago. Image from genomic study:...


3

Why did it evolve ? Mammals with rhinaria tend to have more acute olfaction, and the loss of the rhinarium in the haplorrhine primates is related to their decreased reliance on olfaction, being associated with other derived characteristics such as a reduced number of turbinates. The rhinarium is very useful to animals with good sense of smell ...


3

Tortoiseshell cats (which is the normal name for Calico style cats in Europe) arise due to a gene on the X chromosome. Some patches are ginger, and some tabby due to the deactivation of one X chromosome in each cell at an early stage of development. This produces a tortoiseshell-like pattern. What you see in these tabby cats with the white colouring is due ...


3

Since cats are well adapted to dry environments, the question has some plausibility to it. The book "Mineral Tolerance of Animals" suggests that cats may be able to tolerate slightly more salt in their diet than dogs (1.37 g salt/kg body weight for cats, vs. 0.64 for dogs). However, these represent concentrations that were shown to be safe, not the ...


2

Domestic cats ancestor was likely Felis silvestris or Felis lybica Now this is actually just our best guess, little on the way of fossil evidence has been found but based on genetics Felis silvestris is the closes genetic match to the domesticated cat. However questions have arisen due to the risk of interbreeding, so it is possible Felis lybica may be it ...


2

I agree with some comments that have been made on the validity of the wording used by OP. However there is a legitimate thrust to the question. What could drive Lion sociality? Females are the base unit of lion social groups. Males are generally the nomadic sex. Male lions will try to take over a group of females by killing the current cubs and mating with ...


2

From the Taurine Wikipedia article: The absence of taurine causes a cat's retina to slowly degenerate, causing eye problems and (eventually) irreversible blindness – a condition known as central retinal degeneration (CRD), as well as hair loss and tooth decay. Decreased plasma taurine concentration has been demonstrated to be associated with feline ...


2

Wilson and Reeder (Mammal Species of the World) count 40 species of Felidae. Most of them are small cats (subfamily Felinae). Lions are in the subfamily Pantherinae, which contains only 6 species, one of them the jaguar, Panthera onca, which is solitary, like the tiger, Panthera tigris. By what I know of small cats, Puma concolor included, and the tiger and ...


2

It is either a Canada lynx or a bobcat. From wikipedia: The lynx is between 73 and 107 cm (29 and 42 in) in head-and-body length and stands 48–56 cm (19–22 in) tall at the shoulder; females weigh around 5–12 kg (11–26 lb) while males weigh around 6–17 kg (13–37 lb). The adult bobcat is 47.5 to 125 cm (18.7 to 49.2 in) long from the head to the base of its ...


1

Yes! Many mammals, including cats and humans, produce DMT in small amounts. DMT has been detected in blood and urine and is produced by the enzyme indolethylamine N‐methyltransferase (INMT). These do bind to serotonin receptors. Serotonin receptors are actually expressed in multiple tissues outside of the brain. However, DMT does cross the blood-brain ...


1

Nepeta cataria(Catnip, Catmint, Catnep) is a plant belongs to the family Lamiaceae.It is a herb that has been recognized for its medicinal properties for many centuries. Over time it has been used in remedies to cure internal cancer, smallpox and scarlet fever.Also it was believed that a dense growth bordering fields helped to protect crops because of its ...


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