11

It looks like sustained or consistent moisture might be (at least part of) the phenological cue for flowering: The wikipedia article mentions that consistent humidity will induce flowering in at least some species and cites Fern√°ndez-Alonso & Groenendijk (2004), which says: It generally flowers after the rainy periods, but in humid pastures and under ...


5

It's a nice question, I've tried looking for research papers to no avail. But I will add a few things that I hope will help: Firstly, tap water's composition is quite different from rain water- two criteria for distinction that come to mind would be pH and TDS, details follow: Tap water has a higher TDS (total dissolved solids)than rain water, making it ...


3

That is Himalayan balsam (Impatiens glandulifera). Tall, stems often reddish. Lvs opposite or in threes, with small red teeth. Fls large, pale to dark pink-purple, with short bent spur; July-Oct. Bare places, especially by streams. The Wild Flowers of Britain and Northern Europe. Fitter, Fitter, Blamey. 1974. Collins, London.


3

Each species of flowering plant produces a set number of floral parts, more or less. Having three styles and three stigmas per flower is a trait that is determined genetically. Mutations can cause floral parts to be duplicated. Heirloom tomatoes have mutations in the fascicated and locule-number genes, resulting in more locules being produced per fruit. ...


1

Navoneel Karmakar's answer is correct -- there are many plant species for which bees are crucial or necessary pollinators because of self-incompatibility. Indeed, the disappearance of bees would lead to the collapse of these plant populations if no other mechanism of pollination (e.g. wind) was available. But there are many plants that do not rely on ...


1

One of the goals of every living organism (including plants), thus it seems, is to create offspring for the next generation. This is the way plants (angiosperms) have sex. That said; I personally define pollination as: The act of transferring pollen grains from the male anther of a flower to the female stigma. It should be noted that not only Bees ...


1

It's a Dutchman's Pipe (aka Calico Flower); the genus has over 500 species, but I'm pretty sure this is it.


1

There is nothing you can do to alleviate the effects of (presumably) gro lights being left on for a 24 hour period. It's not likely to have a particularly dramatic effect on a short day facultative plant, other than to possibly delay flowering - it may mean the plant has to go through an extra period of darkness at nights for a longer time, in other words, ...


1

One way getting most attention is re-deriving Crocus sativus again. Crocus sativus (with autotriploid chromosomes) is derived from Crocus cartwrightianus (diploid). ref for this is https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1055790319300879 This article talks about resynthesizing the triploid https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4549961/ ...


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