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69

The three "holes" are the result of the 3 carpels in coconut flowers, and three carpels is typical of the family Arecaceae (Palms). The "holes" are actually germination pores, where one is usually functional and the other two are plugged. The new coconunt shoot will emerge from the functional, open, germination pore. For further info and pictures, see this ...


12

It closely looks like Tibouchina urvilleana* or any other Tibouchina species. You can have a look here. [Source:Wikimedia common] Tibouchina urvilleana is a species of flowering plant in the family Melastomataceae, native to Brazil. Growing to 3–6 m (10–20 ft) tall by 2–3 m (7–10 ft) wide, it is a sprawling evergreen shrub with longitudinally veined, ...


11

It looks like sustained or consistent moisture might be (at least part of) the phenological cue for flowering: The wikipedia article mentions that consistent humidity will induce flowering in at least some species and cites Fernández-Alonso & Groenendijk (2004), which says: It generally flowers after the rainy periods, but in humid pastures and under ...


11

This is a Gerbera, which belongs to the daisy family (Asteraceae). Compare: There are various species. The domesticated cultivars are mostly a result of a cross between Gerbera jamesonii and another South African species Gerbera viridifolia.[5] The cross is known as Gerbera hybrida. Thousands of cultivars exist. (from Wikipedia)


8

It appears to me to be a Night Blooming Cereus: We had one in our greenhouse in Botany. It rarely bloomed, and the bloom was wilted by mid-morning. Night-blooming cereus is the common name referring to a large number of flowering ceroid cacti that bloom at night. The flowers are short lived, and some of these species, such as Selenicereus grandiflorus, ...


8

This plant is in the genus Euphorbia, which is a large and diverse group. The members take wildly different forms, but the general form of this plant is shared by many Euphorbia members. I'm not sure of the species, but think it is most likely Mediterranean Spurge, Euphorbia characias: Photo: Macro63 Photo: cc-by-sa-2.0 Bernard Dupont.


8

This is not Jasione montana, but Phyteuma orbiculare, another member of the family Campanulaceae. Except for the different flowers, Jasione has no leaves on the upper part of the stem. This plant has. And these leaves are toothed and have a heart-shaped base, unlike Jasione. And finally: Phyteuma is resticted to calcarious soils, whereas Jasione prefers non-...


7

This is a Schizanthus "orchid" (actually not a real orchid) called Schizanthus pinnatus ("butterfly orchid" or "poor man's orchid"). It is native to Chile but the plants are also cultivated as ornamentals. It is commonly known as the "small butterfly" ("mariposita") or "small, white butterfly" ("mariposita blanca"). Description Annual plant of 20-50 cm ...


7

It looks like a variety of canna lily. There are several flowers that have opened on the tip of your plant, as in the photo below.


7

Sure, flowers can be sign that the fruit is underway as @JonathanMoore said and viewing any trait as a result of selection is probably what the OP was waiting for. Thinking that if an organism produces a behaviour, then this behaviour must have been selected is wrong though. The reality is that specific behaviours are affected by evolution of other ...


6

Germination of the pollen tube begins when the pollen grain becomes hydrated on the tip of the stigma. The pollen grain absorbs water and also exchanges signals with the stigma. Microchannels form between the pollen grain and the tip of the stigma papillae and water is transferred from the stigma to the pollen grain (Taylor 1997). cAMP, which is produced by ...


6

It is one of the many species and hybrids of Clematis that is grown in gardens. It looks similar to the common Clematis alpina but might be a closely related species or à hybrid. (Picture of C. alpina fr.o.m. Wikipedia)


6

I think it is Anemone hupehensis. We have this species in our garden, and the seeds and dead leaves look very similar to the ones in your picture. The leaves are large,jagged and palmate and they have beautiful flowers in the summer/autumn (I've seen red, pink and white). The fruits/seeds also look very distinctive and cotton-like. The species is originally ...


6

I think the correct answer is @RHA's answer. I will leave my answer just for future reference and discussion. Could it be Jasione montana? Sheep's bit scabious, Jasione montana, is a low-growing plant in the Campanulaceae family found in rocky places and upland regions of Europe and western Asia. Other common names include blue bonnets, blue buttons, ...


6

I had a look at white-flowered plants flowering in July in a site about the flora of the French Alps, and the best I could find was Parnassia palustris: http://www.florealpes.com/fiche_parnassie.php At this developmental stage, it looks quite similar to your photo, with the same kind of structures at the base of the petals. The site says that there are ...


6

The sign agrees. They are petunias. The specific variety of the red ones is raspberry swirl. I don't know the specific variety of the purple ones.


5

This is Kleinia, a genus from Asteraceae family. It is a succulent native to Africa. I found a number of possible candidates, there may be more: Kleinia abyssinica Kleinia fulgens Kleinia stapeliiformis Kleinia pendula P.S. There's not much free information from authoritative sources online about this genus. There are similarities in the blossoms' ...


5

Google image search gave me answer as "Plumeria"


5

It's a mallow. The leaves - they look like maple leaves - and the flower are identical. Mallows are from the family Malvaceae, which includes food plants (okra, cocoa beans, kola nut), economic plants (cotton), and ornamentals (e.g. hibiscus) One species of this family (Althaea officinalis) is actually the original ingredient to make marshmallows. I'm not ...


5

It's a nice question, I've tried looking for research papers to no avail. But I will add a few things that I hope will help: Firstly, tap water's composition is quite different from rain water- two criteria for distinction that come to mind would be pH and TDS, details follow: Tap water has a higher TDS (total dissolved solids)than rain water, making it ...


5

Look like a Spider lily (Lycoris radiata): Source: NC State University


4

Looks a lot like Claytonia lanceolata


4

We called those "Indian strawberries". They are also known as Mock Strawberry (Duchesnea indica). Survivalists are pretty familiar with this plant. They are a lot like strawberries in appearance, but the berry is rounder, not pointed, and held upright (they point up) on the stem, not pending. Though the berries are edible, they don't have much flavor at all....


4

It resembles Lantana Camara, from the family of Verbenaceae that is native to American tropics according to Wikipedia. They come in variety of different colors, and the one you have photographed is the Pink Caprice. Image Source: Cindy Dyer's Blog


4

Here’s how it works. Every morning when the sun breaks over the horizon — no matter what time of year it is — a clock starts ticking inside the trees. After a specific number of hours, the plants’ cells start producing high levels of a molecule known as the FT protein. This protein is responsible for initiating processes that help the plant grow. But the FT ...


3

Okay, so as far as the blue and white flower goes I'm pretty sure it's a cultivar of ipomoea called Flying Saucer which is a hybrid of heavenly blue (I. tricolor) and Pearly gates (also I. tricolor) meaning it's a hybrid and no seed output. As far as the white flowers go it is most likely Datura since it is part of a short shrub and the petals are spiked. ...


3

The second flower is, I'm guessing by the valentine shaped leaf and violet tubular flowers, a morning glory vine (ipomoea violacea or ipomea tricolor). These plants both are closely related cultivars of ololioqui and tlitlitzen which had a history of shamanic use in southern Mexico.


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