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The uniqueness of irises and fingerprints are, as you said, limited to the number of possible permutations of irises and fingerprints. A similar problem exists in computer science, and is known as a hash collision. Given sufficient samples, there will always be a collision for a hash of finite size. However, the sample space is sufficiently large for iris ...


7

Rigor mortis does not cause movement. It causes rigor (Latin for stiffness.) This is only a comparison, but think of it this way. Superglue doesn't shrink or change the shape of the connection of the two things glued together; it just holds them there with powerful 'stiffness'. So imagine that at death, part of our muscle cells exuded superglue. You would ...


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@March Ho's answer is an excellent answer based on the assumption that all of the observed phenotypic variance is due to genetic variance. Environmental variance The genetic variance is not the only underlying variance that can explain variance in phenotypic traits. There is probably quite a lot of phenotypic variance that is caused by the underlying ...


4

Should be fine, but if I were you, I'd spare a few more minutes and carry on until ethanol precipitation (15 min of work at worst). Here's the protocol: https://www.thermofisher.com/pl/en/home/references/protocols/nucleic-acid-purification-and-analysis/dna-extraction-protocols/phenol-chloroform-extraction.html You can store it in -20 degrees for several ...


2

To answer the questions separately: 1 - "Could the scientists tell that this man is different from other humans?" The functional basis of DNA fingerprinting, is to use regions of DNA that are known to be highly variable between individuals, such as micro- and minisatellites (short, highly repetitive stretches of DNA). This is explained in fairly basic ...


2

Could the technicians/scientists who perform the DNA fingerprinting procedure for the FBI be able to tell that this man is different from other humans? If by different you mean genetically engineered, it depends on whether the loci tested have been engineered to such an extent that they are substantially different from other humans in order to arouse some ...


1

Yes, we leave DNA on everything we come in contact with. Even simply standing, we shed skin cells and hair (although only the follicle has DNA) etc. DNA may also be transferred from clothes to clothes. You might be interested to read this article :) http://www.forensicsciencesimplified.org/dna/how.html


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okkkk. I did a big project on this... and here's some of my research... let's hope it answers your question Facial reconstruction (also known as craniofacial identification) is a method used in the forensic field. Many people view facial reconstruction as an art instead of science. Art is commonly portrayed as the expression or application of human ...


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This should be a comment The most common causes of failures related to the laboratory process were contamination and human error. Most human errors could be corrected, whereas gross contamination in crime samples often resulted in irreversible consequences. (article) In DNA fingerprinting work, it is well known that, although fragment lengths ...


1

This process helps with the signal to noise ratio. In theory, you could use the fingerprinting techniques to dice up the few billion copies of the DNA and carefully measure them. However, it is far easier to replicate the DNA to increase the number of molecules of DNA available to the process. Remember, fingerprinting for crime investigations doesn't ...


1

mtDNA is present in a much higher copy number per cell than nuclear DNA. According to this paper, there are approximately 4000 or so mitochondrial DNA copies per human muscle cell. copy number of mtDNA per diploid nuclear genome in myocardium was 6970 ± 920, significantly higher than that in skeletal muscle, 3650 ± 620 (P = 0.006). This makes it far ...


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