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What's the term for "Amino acid regulating the expression of components used to synthesize it"?

The method of inhibition of the operation an anabolic metabolic pathway by the final product synthesized is called: End-product Inhibition or Feedback Inhibition Of more biochemical interest is the ...
David's user avatar
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5 votes

Difference between viral and native RNA

There is no fundamental difference between viral RNA and and native cellular RNA other than the sequence of RNA bases in them. The sequence differences are not biochemically apparent in the RNA, only ...
mgkrebbs's user avatar
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5 votes
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How much time do the different mechanisms of gene regulation need to take effect?

People often imprecisely say that type of regulation takes place on the order of many minutes to hours, and that may be as precise as you can get given the variable kinetics of any given pathway. ...
Jory's user avatar
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5 votes
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Which genetic oscillator should I use to generate oscillations in range of 2-20 mins?

I believe that what you are aiming to do is not possible with the mechanisms that you propose. In most transcriptional and translational genetic circuits, the limiting factor for switching state is ...
jakebeal's user avatar
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3 votes

what are the nodes and edges in gene regulatory networks

You're asking for a short answer to an entire field of research. You won't get a comprehensive one that fits in a SE answer. Generally, yes the genes/their products (which are often treated as the ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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3 votes
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What is the best way to learn about gene regulation?

I would not learn from the primary literature, the terminology will likely be confusing and there will be a tendency to conflate whatever the current methods are with the concepts. I'd suggest going ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
2 votes

Can a miRNA be upregulated and downregulated in the same disease

Since diseases are frequently complex, it is not surprising to find specific genes (both miRNA coding genes or protein coding genes) being deferentially regulated when different studies of similar-...
Sergei's user avatar
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2 votes
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Can the brain influence gene expression?

As has been pointed out in comments, the brain can certainly affect gene expression; but so can anything in our bodies, because the blood stream is super good at carrying stuff around the body to ...
Williham Totland's user avatar
2 votes
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On enhancers, strands, and zygosity

...an enhancer sits on just one of DNA's two strands (usually the same strand as the protein-coding DNA gene itself). Yes and no. Enhancers are in fact sometimes palindromic, so they're mirrored on ...
Armatus's user avatar
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2 votes
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Books on machine learning applications in Biology

At NIPS 2016 most ANN implementations I saw were related to biology were trained on imaging data, thus the kind of comprehensive book you are looking for probably doesn't exist yet. However, if you ...
virtualxtc's user avatar
2 votes

What are the relative roles of coding DNA versus regulatory DNA thought to be in evolution?

Yes, a simple google search reveals millions of academic citations talking about "regulatory evolution". But it's a little over-simplistic to divide coding vs. regulatory DNA. Indeed, some ...
Maximilian Press's user avatar
2 votes

Difference between viral and native RNA

(If you wonder I'm posting two answers, it's because this q-post asked two questions in one.) Regarding the issue of virus self-assembly... studying it has indeed been a challenging issue. There's a ...
against very long user names's user avatar
2 votes

If the AraC protein was a gene repressor when it binds arabinose, would there be high or low transcription levels when arabinose is present?

A repressor inhibits transcription, thus one expects low transcription when the repressor is present. Thus, if a protein acts as a repressor when it binds arabinose, then when arabinose is present the ...
jakebeal's user avatar
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2 votes
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Are the subordinate genes of a repressed operon really "turned off"?

There are several mechanisms by which the expression of a gene can be completely turned off. Certain network architectures can ensure foolproof repression (for e.g. by using multiple repressors ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
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2 votes
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Are all genes capable of being switched on or off?

I cannot think of a mechanism that would entirely prevent a gene from being regulated. For example, consider mechanisms like histone modification: there is very little about the sequence of a single ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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1 vote

Is there a resource/paper containing information about which co-activators are often associated with a given transcription factor?

This website can be used to search for protein interactomes: http://www.interactome-atlas.org/ might help you.
Paul Goodman's user avatar
1 vote

qPCR - different results total RNA vs mRNA

There are a few possibilities. For whatever reason, your transcript of interest is poorly captured by your mRNA enrichment such that, in both the control and the treatment, mRNA enrichment selects ...
acvill's user avatar
  • 8,296
1 vote

Gene regulation and epigenetics in specialized cells

Correct me if I am wrong but it seems you are asking 'do epigenetic mechanisms influence cell fate/determination?'. If this is your question, the answer is yes. Epigenetic modifications play a key ...
aquaporin's user avatar
  • 188
1 vote

How to biologically interpret path weight summation in weighted and directed gene regulation network?

There's quite a bit of use of graph theoretic approaches in gene regulation, so I'd suggest you start there and Stand on the Shoulders of Giants rather than reinventing gravity: https://scholar.google....
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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1 vote

How do enhancers induce transcription?

The activators are proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences in the enhancer region. These activators also bind to the RNA polymerase and other associated members of the transcription complex, ...
Thymine's user avatar
  • 259
1 vote

Question about alternative polyadenylation

According to a 2011 review1 alterntive polyadenylation sites can be located upstream of the 3'UTR (i.e. within introns or exons). When these sites are used it results in transcripts missing exons at ...
tyersome's user avatar
  • 5,598
1 vote
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Can gene-gene interactions result in gene expression?

I don't know anything about your algorithms. But i will try to explain your the format of data that was given to you. I don't know your background in Biology, so i will assume it is not your expertise ...
Untitpoi's user avatar
  • 354
1 vote

Why are tumor suppressor genes recessive?

Note that while this is generally true - there is also a phenomenon of haploinsufficiency with some tumour suppressors. That means losing one copy is enough to permit tumour development. See http://...
Ankur Chakravarthy's user avatar
1 vote
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Why are tumor suppressor genes recessive?

I was typing out an explanation, but then realized that this text book does a much better job: Lodish et al. 2000. Section 24.2: Proto-Oncogenes and Tumor-Suppressor Genes in Molecular Cell Biology ...
canadianer's user avatar
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1 vote

Finding targets of transcription factors

If you were interested in human targets, one easy way is GeneCards, which aggregates other resources, and combines computational and (some) experimental data: In this case the inverse problem is ...
tsttst's user avatar
  • 1,597
1 vote

What are some online databases that I can search to find the pathways for sythesis of Lignin, Cellulose, GAX?

The other big metabolic database site besides Kegg is MetaCyc which certainly responds to searches for lignin and cellulose. The problem with lignin is that it is a very complex molecule, so in both ...
David's user avatar
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1 vote
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Can the same target gene be regulated differently by the same transcription factor under different conditions?

Short answer - yes but probably somewhat rarely. Transcription factors aren't necessarily limited to being either repressors or activators. In practice they mostly do one a lot more than the other - ...
Dermot Harnett's user avatar
1 vote

Books on machine learning applications in Biology

I own a book entitled Bioinformatics, The Machine Learning Approach, by Baldi and Brunak. I haven’t done more than glance at it, but it might be of interest. It’s more geared to bioinformatics than ...
David's user avatar
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1 vote
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Finding Regulatory Elements: How Have People Been Doing This?

As it can be seen from (more or less recent) discovery, most of the regulators were discovered through specifically designed experiment to exhibit one particular factor. Several examples include: The ...
ColibriIO's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote

How do messenger RNAs regulate each other's expression levels?

Typically, these experimenters aren't thinking that the mRNAs directly regulate each others' expression levels, but rather that the proteins they code for affect expression. They're just mRNA as a ...
Daniel Weissman's user avatar

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