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Important notes: I am not going into the ethical aspects of editing/removing CCR5 in human embryos, neither will I discuss potential effects of introducing that mutation into the human population. Both of these are very important issues, but out of the scope for this answer. As of now I'm not aware of any reliable sources of what was actually done in ...


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Citing wikipedia: Gene delivery is the process of introducing foreign DNA into host cells. Gene therapy is the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acid polymers into a patient's cells as a drug to treat disease. In other words, 'gene therapy' refers to the use of 'gene delivery' for therapeutic goals.


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Let's imagine that we understood DNA programming and our genome very well and >realized that there were some significant flaws (we die, we need sleep, etc.) And >let's imagine that we understand how to make our genome do what we want, but it's a >major refactor. We're going to have adjust 10-15% of our DNA. I think we both recognise that this is a very ...


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The scope of this question is too wide to be answered on Biology SE. However I will give you very brief answers to your questions (as I have rephrased them) and point you towards some sources of basic information on the Internet. After reading these you may wish to return with more specific questions. I have also briefly summarized some of the problems which ...


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I think the structure of this question could be less opinion based as De Novo stated above. But a recent article published by mayo clinic will help shed light on the question. Falls under the category of regenerative medicine I believe. Senolytics Article EDIT: Since links are apparently a taboo, here is the paper. Educational on current research and ...


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Consider how a Retrovirus can modify existing cell DNA to 'execute instructions' on its behalf. Not only retroviruses do that. Actually, pretty much all viruses use the machinery of the host cell on its behalf. Why can we not utilize lab-generated viruses to infect sick patients with a 'healthy' virus that would rewrite bad segments of DNA with something ...


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Your question is too broad. It is better to take some specific example. Not all cell's in the body divide. If you take cell out of the body and want to return it back, it must divide. So we probably could talk about stem cells for example. The stem cells don not really sit in one place. And it almost impossible now to get such cells from the place that they ...


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You run the risk of the killed cells suddenly releasing huge quantities of cytokines. If this occurs you may cause spike in capillary permeability and basically create massive sepsis. The bacteria will have to be killed SLOWLY to prevent them spilling their contents into the circulatory system. But, I have always believed phages could be engineered to ...


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The Eliava Institute in Tiflis (Georgia (a country)) has been at it since the 1930`s. A US company sells a phageproduct for desinfection of meat. The risk of Phagetherapy is there, if the phage is ill choosen or contaminated with other phage it could introduce pathogenic genes to the target or other bacteria. If those risks are eliminated there is very ...


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A major drawback and problem with your idea is that some genetic problems are developmental and have no effect if applied on adults. For example, a gene known to cause crooked teeth would have to be fixed before permanent teeth grow in - no point in patching it after that, except if you also want to patch in infinite tooth replacement. Retroactively fixing ...


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