96

At the moment, there is very little scientific literature about this, but I found two papers that address the problem and are fairly easy to understand. You can find them in the references. Reference 1 is probably the most interesting and is the basis for this answer. As far as I can see, there are a few major points taken up by conspiracy theories. 1. ...


39

This is a poly(A) tail, which is a feature found in the majority of eukaryotic RNAs (especially mRNA) and is also not uncommon in RNA viruses (which essentially mimic endogenous mRNA for their own replication). As with mRNA, this poly(A) tail in coronaviruses is bound by poly(A) binding protein in the cytoplasm [1], which is involved in translation ...


13

If you need more [counter]evidence, there's a newer paper "The proximal origin of SARS-CoV-2" by Andersen et al. (March, 17) that touches on the same topic. The paper brings up two reasons why SARS-CoV-2 is not "made in a lab". The first is the (relative) [in]efficiency of its spike protein; the second is somewhat more complex to explain and is related to ...


8

Even a male cell can count the number of X chromosomes. (Lee et al. 1996; Cell 86: 83-84) When X inactivation is getting started the two chromosomes "kiss" - a process that lasts for a couple of hours (first shown by Jeannie Lee in 1996). The physical contact between two X chromosomes is over a small fraction of the chromosome but it's essential for ...


5

If you are referring to the massive death toll among native Americans due to the epidemic disease outbreaks after first contact with European settlers, then the answer is rather straightforward (Science magazine News, 2016): The immune system is a complex structure, built over a person’s life in response to environmental conditions. Antibodies, proteins ...


4

This is an interesting question. A recent study published on bioRxiv by researchers from Xi'an, China (pre-print) argues that CD147 can also be an entry receptor for the virus. They showed virus entry can be blocked by an antibody to human CD147.


1

To answer your question multiple parameters which one should be taken into account. There are two main sets of parameters: gene specific and cell line specific. Parameters related to your specific gene of interest : Do you know the half-life of the RNA of your gene of interest? Most of the time it is not known but there are several tools and resources ...


1

Possibly https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6456/eaat7693.long is what you were looking for? It implicates a few specific genes - the connection to olfaction is interesting (I would suggest it could be fun to look up the vomeronasal organ, terminal nerve, and GnRH). [Alex Reynolds' suggestion of https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-15736-4 is ...


1

"XO" (an unpaired X chromosome) is characteristic of Turner syndrome. The Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_syndrome provides a typical image - a woman with a fairly distinctive broadness of the neck. The phenotype is described as female, though of course gender identity can be unpredictable for anyone. For the other monozygotic twin ...


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