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Cannibalism is incredibly common in nature. There are more species that eat their own kind than do not. Chimps eat other chimps. Lions eat other lions. Wolves eat other wolves. Prairie dogs go into the burrows of other prairie dogs and eat their babies to get the protein-rich meals needed to produce milk for their own litter. The only animals that don't ...


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Adding to what the two other answers have said, normal DNA fingerprinting tests do not tell the researcher how many chromosomes the organism has. That is part of a different process called karyotyping. However, karyotyping is actually surprisingly low-tech, people have been karyotyping for years before genetic sequencing was even a thing. That said, it is ...


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No, Cas13 can't be used to edit DNA. Cas13 does not contain nuclease domains RuvC and HNH domains responsible for DNA cleavage, so they cannot directly edit the genome. For that Cas9 and Cas12a is used.


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A "mutation" is a permanent alteration of the genetic composition of an individual. To obey this definition, a base change in one strand must be accompanied by a corresponding change in the opposite strand. Only in this way a mutation can be transmitted to the offspring. The situation where only one of the strands has undergone a base change ...


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Let me elaborate on swbarnes2’s answer. The “Possibility of Jane's brother being a carrier” is indeed the trickiest part of the overall question. I have seen that even some teachers of genetics were puzzled when seeing the correct answer (2/3). It is true that before the brother is born the probability of he being Cc is given by the standard Mendelian rule, ...


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And this is the part that I am not getting. For me, Jane's brother could only have a 1 in 2 chance of being a carrier (Cc or CC). Wrong, because those are not equally likely. There are 4 equally likely possibilities for any of Jane's siblings: inherit good allele from Mom, good from Dad, inherit bad allele from Mom, good from Dad, inherit good allele from ...


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For plants, seed (egg cell) parent is shown first and pollen (sperm) parent second. The rule is mentioned in wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_(biology) section : in plants. Another mention of plant example: https://www.rhododendron.org/v50n1p36.htm


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Obviously, there won't be a single number for this. The phenomenon is fairly well understood in yeast. Unfortunately, most studies tend to focus on the rate of formation of specific well-understood rearrangements, and then use that as a baseline. I am having trouble finding a measurement of overall rearrangement rate, although the system is ideal for this. ...


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A short answer (converted from a comment): I would call neutral theory a useful null model: in particular, it may be less important that it be a factually correct description of natural systems (i.e. "most alleles can be treated as being neutral (or weakly deleterious") than that it provides a useful standard for distinguishing which alleles are ...


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Your question would deserve a long essay. R.C. Lewontin wrote a book ("The genetic basis of evolutionary change" - Columbia U.P) on this subject in 1974, right after the neutral theory had been explicitly formulated in the previous few years. The reasons for the controversy over this theory are still alive some 50 years later, despite the enormous ...


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I think you need to clarify what kind of research you are doing. Breeding and genetic modification might both produce the desired result, but in research it is likely not the main point (but instead getting to this result in a certain way and obtaining the insights from doing this). There are many studies on coloring of zebrafish and guppies, producing all ...


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Let me focus on the necessary and sufficient part: such a language is suitable in mathematics, but does not really have much meaning in evolutionary/statistical context. Instead we talk about rejecting the null hypothesis, which does not mean accepting the alternative hypothesis. Equally, a failure to reject the null hypothesis does not mean that this ...


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The answer depends on (at least): whether the woman is affected by the condition whether the allele is autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive (excluding X-linked recession) the frequency of the diseased alleles in the population the presence or not of inbreeding Below I assume no inbreeding. The woman is affected and the inheritance is autosomal ...


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Yes, this is perfectly fine. Many companies sell PCR Master Mixes (granted, without primers): Thermo Fisher Sigma-Aldrich BioRad Promega Qiagen If you choose to make your own, make sure it's stored at -20°C, and be sure to aliquot it so it's not going to be subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles. Obviously you should mix it well before aliquoting, but ...


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Based on the paper (open access) from which this figure was adapted, the 38-77 group consists of 5 gene families with 38, 47, 57, 64 or 77 members. In contrast, there are 284 “families” with 2 members, 91 with 3 members, 42 with 4 members, 25 with 5 members, etc. This is clearer in the original figure: Thus the larger gene families are outliers and there ...


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