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1

To answer your question multiple parameters which one should be taken into account. There are two main sets of parameters: gene specific and cell line specific. Parameters related to your specific gene of interest : Do you know the half-life of the RNA of your gene of interest? Most of the time it is not known but there are several tools and resources ...


4

This is an interesting question. A recent study published on bioRxiv by researchers from Xi'an, China (pre-print) argues that CD147 can also be an entry receptor for the virus. They showed virus entry can be blocked by an antibody to human CD147.


13

If you need more [counter]evidence, there's a newer paper "The proximal origin of SARS-CoV-2" by Andersen et al. (March, 17) that touches on the same topic. The paper brings up two reasons why SARS-CoV-2 is not "made in a lab". The first is the (relative) [in]efficiency of its spike protein; the second is somewhat more complex to explain and is related to ...


1

Possibly https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6456/eaat7693.long is what you were looking for? It implicates a few specific genes - the connection to olfaction is interesting (I would suggest it could be fun to look up the vomeronasal organ, terminal nerve, and GnRH). [Alex Reynolds' suggestion of https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-15736-4 is ...


0

Every year we have a risk of cancer. With enough rolls of the dice they will come up snake eyes. That said, https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/incidence/age#collapseZero highlights an interesting issue. The incidence of cancer increases greatly from birth to seventies, then decreases. If you are being optimistic enough ...


96

At the moment, there is very little scientific literature about this, but I found two papers that address the problem and are fairly easy to understand. You can find them in the references. Reference 1 is probably the most interesting and is the basis for this answer. Edit: It is also interesting to read reference 2 on the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the article ...


8

Even a male cell can count the number of X chromosomes. (Lee et al. 1996; Cell 86: 83-84) When X inactivation is getting started the two chromosomes "kiss" - a process that lasts for a couple of hours (first shown by Jeannie Lee in 1996). The physical contact between two X chromosomes is over a small fraction of the chromosome but it's essential for ...


1

"XO" (an unpaired X chromosome) is characteristic of Turner syndrome. The Wikipedia article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turner_syndrome provides a typical image - a woman with a fairly distinctive broadness of the neck. The phenotype is described as female, though of course gender identity can be unpredictable for anyone. For the other monozygotic twin ...


-1

Obligatory not a biologist, I studied physics. In a very basic way, and ignoring the limits of carbon chemistry, it's all a question of understanding. If you imagine DNA, and genetics as a whole akin to a language, we're currently barely able to read it, let alone write. We know the letters of the genetic alphabet, at this point (Adenine, Thymine, Guanine ...


41

This is a poly(A) tail, which is a feature found in the majority of eukaryotic RNAs (especially mRNA) and is also not uncommon in RNA viruses (which essentially mimic endogenous mRNA for their own replication). As with mRNA, this poly(A) tail in coronaviruses is bound by poly(A) binding protein in the cytoplasm [1], which is involved in translation ...


-5

There was extensive pre columbian contact so the entire theory may be rejected. Example The claim that smallpox killed all the natives originated from historians. There was never any science or evidence behind it. As the other answer showed modern natives actually have less of the purported genes. Biologists have no need to defend it.


5

If you are referring to the massive death toll among native Americans due to the epidemic disease outbreaks after first contact with European settlers, then the answer is rather straightforward (Science magazine News, 2016): The immune system is a complex structure, built over a person’s life in response to environmental conditions. Antibodies, proteins ...


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