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Summary Reassignment of an UGA codon as a selenocysteine codon is thought to involve the interaction of obligatory secondary structure elements called selenocysteine insertion sequences (SECIS) with the dedicated translation elongation factor that presents a unique tRNA aminoacylated with selenocysteine to the ribosome. However the location of these elements ...


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I think almost everything is correct except for the last part. The reason one may easily overlook that part is that we inherit the complete 22 molecules from our mother who inherited the whole 2.35 * 10^10 molecules from her grandmother zygote. Grandma gave the whole thing to her daughter and that that number was distributed in all the cells in mom's body, ...


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Edit: I am only addressing aneuploidies as those are the examples given. Other classes of mutation have distinct mechanisms, so I would split those out into another question if you are interested. Chromosomal abnormalities occur more frequently when it is hard for cells to do meiosis and mitosis properly with a chromosome, or when the chromosome is more ...


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You might have already tried this, but how about doing a BLAST search using one of the sequences you do have, and perhaps limiting the organism to Staph a. More info: The below article did a similar comparison and mentions types RN9 and FAR10, perhaps these are related (or misspelled originally) See below. "Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of blaZ ...


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Standard definition of "phenotype" The term phenotype is generally not clearly defined. Most often, textbooks will define a phenotype as any anatomical, morphological, physiological or behavioural observable characteristic of an individual. This definition is somewhat vague as it is unclear how far reaching the impact of the behaviour can be. To my ...


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Yes. See for example this article, which describes how some viruses can pick up bits of human DNA. Here's a quote from the article: ...researchers have shown that a large group of viruses, including the influenza viruses and other serious pathogens, steal genetic signals from their hosts to expand their own genomes.


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There can be and often is more than one crossover per chromosome in meiosis, but how many crossovers occur can depend on the species, sex, age, environment, and which particular chromosome is involved1,2,3. For example, humans typically show 2-3 crossovers per chromosome, but females often show higher recombination rates than males. However, the structure ...


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