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For Penicillin production try from page 165 of: Industrial Microbiology: An Introduction by Michael J. Waites Neil L. Morgan John S. Rockey Gary Higton There is also a table in that chapter listing the other antibiotics and which organisms are used to produce the basic form. I found it very readable.


2

...cut with a knife... Yes, freeze them.... slowly. <evil laugh> Freezing causes ice crystals to form inside the cells. These act like little knives. The slower the freezing happens, the larger these ice crystals get. The larger the ice crystals, the more damage they will do by piercing the cell wall and other important membranes. This is why if you ...


31

My (limited) understanding is that it is quite hard to avoid killing some bacteria even with very gentle physical manipulation. On the other hand, it is quite hard to use physical force to achieve reasonable level of sterilization. Let's bring some examples with a few (hastily found) references. Pressure My guess is that most examples the OP mentions (hit ...


19

There are plenty of physical or mechanical methods of killing bacteria, but most are used in conjunction with other agents and probably don't qualify as "blunt force trauma". For example, beer distributers might snake a brush through a keg line to disrupt any bacterial biofilms before flushing them out with disinfectant. Similar logic applies to ...


4

From a biochemical point of view, it is surprisingly difficult to break open a bacterial cell. A molecular biologist, for example, might want to break E.coli cells expressing a protein of interest, in order to purify the protien Some of the methods employed are agitation with glass beads, griding with glass beads, sonication, and high-pressure cell ...


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Yes of course. While you can't swing a blunt object comparable in size to humans at something many orders of magnitude smaller to kill it. You can use something like an ultra sonicator, which swings a small blunt object at --you guessed it-- very high speeds to generate lots of shear forces in a liquid culture. Usually these instruments are not meant for ...


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