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102 votes
Accepted

Can HIV be transmitted via mosquitos?

No, this is not possible. There are a few reasons for that, but most important are that the only thing a mosquito injects is its own saliva, while the blood is sucked into the stomach where it is ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 51.7k
33 votes
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How did scientists discover HIV?

HIV was identified as an infectious disease through classical epidemiology, and the virus was identified through classical virology. I won't get into the epidemiology, but briefly it went pretty much ...
iayork's user avatar
  • 14.3k
13 votes

Can HIV be transmitted via mosquitos?

I am not a medical doctor but in my view this is within the realms of possibility. The probability has been estimated by Princeton at 1 in 10 million. This is per bite, assuming - I presume - that the ...
Marcus Junius Brutus's user avatar
9 votes
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What are the potential dangers (if any) facing the twin girls recently born in China with their CCR5 gene modified?

Important notes: I am not going into the ethical aspects of editing/removing CCR5 in human embryos, neither will I discuss potential effects of introducing that mutation into the human population....
Nicolai's user avatar
  • 4,391
9 votes
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Can people with AIDS/HIV be vaccinated?

Can people with AIDS/HIV be vaccinated? Yes. Immunization is an important part of the overall treatment strategy for HIV positive individuals. HIV infection is a risk factor for a number of vaccine ...
De Novo's user avatar
  • 8,811
7 votes
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What percentage of HIV cases are caused by each of the following pathways?

Here's a start, from WHO/European Centre for Disease Control. From the report, for new infections in Europe not including the Russian Federation (or Belgium) in 2019: 50% heterosexual contact (not ...
Ben Bolker's user avatar
  • 5,364
7 votes

Can people with AIDS/HIV be vaccinated?

Can people with HIV still be vaccinated? No (most of the time) if the vaccine is an attenuated vaccine, this means it contains living organisms that have been modified in order to reduce their ...
nsa's user avatar
  • 418
6 votes
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Why doesn't HIV spread through vectors?

This doesn't take much effort to answer! Googling "HIV mosquito" brings us straight to this blog post, which gives three main reasons (along with more details, links to other resources, etc....
Ben Bolker's user avatar
  • 5,364
6 votes

Can Covid-19 (similarly to HIV) infect T-Cells?

As referenced the publication you shared, other human corona viruses also infect, but do not replicate in T cells, so it's not "Big News" in the sense of being a novel or unexpected finding. This also ...
MikeyC's user avatar
  • 4,744
5 votes
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Does the mutation CCR5-delta 32 increase the genetic info?

Whether or not a mutation changes the 'amount' (meaning the size of the genome) of genetic information present in an individual depends on the type of mutation and is independent on which gene is ...
Nicolai's user avatar
  • 4,391
3 votes

What are the potential dangers (if any) facing the twin girls recently born in China with their CCR5 gene modified?

2019-09-29 update: the answer below is based on a scientific paper that seems to have a major flaw, see https://www.statnews.com/2019/09/27/major-error-undermines-study-suggesting-change-introduced-in-...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
3 votes

Are these statements about the effectiveness of condoms in preventing HIV transmission reconcilable?

Note that those three statements are also approximately equivalent to pregnancy risk in the context of vaginal intercourse: Condoms form an essentially impermeable barrier to sperm Sexual activities ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is there any chance that the COVID-19 virus could become more deadly by it interacting with the HIV virus?

While some viruses, such as influenza, can indeed hybridize to form different strains, you should not worry about SARS-CoV-2 hybridizing with anything but another coronavirus. They are simply too far ...
jakebeal's user avatar
  • 6,987
2 votes

Why doesn't HIV give you cancer if retroviral gene therapy gives you cancer?

Short answer: Most HIV-infected cells will die before transforming into cancer. Retroviral gene therapy may increase risk of cancer since the integration into the cell's genome can be faulty (strand ...
markur's user avatar
  • 1,779
2 votes

Why can't we always create a vaccine against a virus when an ELISA test to detect it is possible?

I found the question quite interesting and will to provide a concept and a speculation although I could not answer the question to my own satisfaction (edits to this regard are welcome) Currently (...
Prashant Bharadwaj's user avatar
2 votes

How much of the genotype-phenotype map do we understand in HIV?

I'm sure HIV is well studied since as you know it has a small genome and is highly relevent to therapeutic research, but virus regulation can be complicated and not representative of what happens in ...
Cell's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Viral RNA to DNA

Via: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_transcriptase#Replication_fidelity There are three different replication systems during the life cycle of a retrovirus. First of all, the reverse ...
Alex Reynolds's user avatar
2 votes

What advantages could there be for using the unseen variant chosen by He Jiankui instead of the naturally occurring CCR5-∆ 32 mutation?

Possibly He Jiankui was using Cas9 without a template DNA. If so, this generates double-stranded breaks that are repaired through processes such as non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that often ...
tyersome's user avatar
  • 5,598
2 votes

How is TB harmful in HIV patients?

This is an interesting an useful question about host-pathogen interactions. For a general reference (for both hosts with and without a competent CD4+ T-cell response) see Cecil Medicine, Ch.332, and ...
De Novo's user avatar
  • 8,811
2 votes

How much time does HIV live outside the body?

The general response to that question is not long, the HIV is a weak virus and that once exposed to air, it can survive for maybe a few minutes at best. BUT Under specific conditions, HIV can survive ...
Bilal's user avatar
  • 761
2 votes

Effect of HIV on T-cells

From this article: Researchers found that when the virus productively infects the few permissive CD4 T cells present, death occurs through apoptosis mediated by an enzyme called caspase-3. But when ...
Al-'s user avatar
  • 109
2 votes

It is possible for person with AIDS be negative for HIV antibodies?

Sure, it is possible in the late stages of AIDS. Once the immune system is pretty much wiped out, the person has AIDS and is unable to produce HIV antibodies. There is nothing left of the immune ...
JayCkat's user avatar
  • 2,932
2 votes

How do opportunistic infections affect an immunocompromised or AIDS patient?

Clinical diagnosis of AIDS in a person infected with HIV is based on the following criteria: A CD4+ T-cell count below 200 cells/µl (or a CD4+ T-cell percentage of total lymphocytes of less than 14%)...
hibernicah's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

CD4+ as Monocytes cell surface receptors

Macrophages and monocytic cells can express CD4, CD8 or even co-express them. The CD4 and CD8 molecules interact with MHC complexes on neighboring cells, and as you can imagine elicit varying effect ...
CKM's user avatar
  • 8,119
2 votes
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Why does HIV chooses the Macrophage cells to infect first?

Short answer HIV infects macrophages because macrophages display the CD4 cell surface receptor needed for initial HIV attachment, and also display the co-receptors CCR5 and/or CXCR4 that are also ...
Andrew Guy's user avatar
1 vote

Does reversion of resistant strains to wild-type only occur when no more drug pressure is exerted

I am not an expert on HIV but I am answering based on general principles. This is a typical example of selection of individuals/populations with different fitness. Reversion to wild-type (WT) would ...
WYSIWYG's user avatar
  • 35.6k
1 vote

In the life-cycle of the HIV virus, how does the created DNA enter the nuclear membrane?

Some proteins are transported from cytoplasm to nucleus by the importin family through nuclear pore. These proteins have a specific sequence called Nuclear Localization Sequence (NLS) and the importin ...
ironKUMA's user avatar
  • 101

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