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Short answer About 0.79% of the light gets through on average, but there is variability across wavelengths and individuals. (variability between individuals seems to be correlated with density of macromolecules in the eyelid). Long answer: This is called "eyelid spectral transmittance". Lucky for you, Bierman et al (2011) sought to determine the ...


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The genetic condition you are describing is called green cone monochromacy (GCM). This condition is exceedingly rare because it requires the dual inheritance of tritanopia (absence of blue retinal photoreceptors) and protanopia (absence of red retinal photoreceptors).1 Consequently, I can find very little information on the experience of people with GCM. In ...


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Found a likely answer from the "See also" section of the link provided in acvill's answer. Turns out it seems that you can somewhat approach this situation by exploiting cone cell fatigue to lessen blue and red cone cells's response to green light. While this isn't exactly the situation described in the question (since I assume red and blue cone ...


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The human eye is thought to react about 1/24 of a second, but I'm not sure how fast it is when it touches an eyelash


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There are two phenomena described in the quoted text, and while there is some relationship between them, they are indeed distinct: spectral sensitivity of the human eye, and longitudinal/axial chromatic aberration of the eye resulting from variation of refractive index of the lens by wavelength. I found the following on Physics.SE: https://physics....


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