98

Blood is not a good source of water. 1 liter of blood contains about 800 mL of water, 170 grams of protein and 2 grams of sodium (calculated from the composition of lamb blood). When metabolized, 170 grams of protein yields the amount of urea that requires 1,360 mL of water to be excreted in urine (calculated from here); 2 grams of sodium requires about ...


30

The answer to this, I reckon, is that they don't. They use molecular oxygen (O2) dissolved in the water for respiration, where it acts as a terminal electron acceptor, just as we use molecular oxygen in the air for respiration. We can speak of the water as being oxygenated. Water is split in photosynthesis, where reducing equivalents from water are used ...


26

This is a species in the Peristediidae family, commonly called armored searobins or armored gurnards. found in deep waters around the world, with most species in tropical regions. They are related to the searobins in the family Triglidae, and some authorities classify them in that family,2[3] but they are encased in heavy scales with prominent spines. ...


22

A tiny Japanese puffer fish creates a grand sand sculpture on the featureless seabed by using his fins to dig furrows. He uses this to attract the attention of passing females. Why do puffer fish build sandcastles? (BBC) Further observation revealed that this “mysterious circle” was not just there to make the ocean floor look pretty. Attracted ...


19

Original Answer It looks to me like a species of sculpin, for example, the "short-horned sculpin" Myoxocephalus scorpius. http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/kalat/short-horn-sculpin Best answer After some deliberation, and it appears the other very good answer was for some reason removed: the OP fish appears to be a northern sea robin Prionotus ...


19

I agree with @Gerardo-Furtado's comment that what you most likely have here is a colonial tunicate (or sea squirt) from the genus Botrylloides. According to images and information available via the Taxanomic Toolkit for Marine Life of Port Phillip Bay$^2$, it appears as though you have a specimen of Botrylloides perspicuus (aka B. perspicuum). [Photo ...


19

You can drink blood of course to a minimalistic amount (eg- a few teaspoons ) and also if blood is free from pathogens. But it should always be in very small amounts and from suitable donor. Here's why The strange fact is, blood, when drank, is toxic. When confined to places where blood is supposed to be — such as the heart, vessels, and so on — it is ...


17

While fish tend to move from side to side (lateral undulation) for which a vertical tail makes sense, the land ancestors of marine mammals had their limbs under them and so their spines were already adapted to up and down movement (dorsoventral undulation). When these animals moved to marine environments, they continued up and down movement in their swimming,...


16

This "nest" is created by a male pufferfish for both courtship and for rearing young. The male puffer fish uses its body and fins (a combination of pectoral, anal, and caudal -- see here) to break up the sand into fine particles and to move it around into the pattern seen above. It swims in channel-like (or furrow) patterns to create the ray pattern seen: ...


15

That is a blue parrotfish (Scarus coeruleus): (photo: Marc Tarlock via Wikimedia Commons)


13

I agree with you that the question is ambiguous, and also that the most sensible answer would be C. However, one could make a more or less reasonable argument in favor of several other answers, too. a. The common ancestor of whales and fish possessed genes for fins. Technically, this statement is true. At least some of the fins of whales and fish are ...


11

The front part of the fish looks like part of the cranium of a fish. I'd bet that the tusks have been "made" by removing some bones in the middle. Well, after having looked at the links given by Remi.b, it seems that it's not even necessary to remove bones. This is probably a Peristediidae. You can find some images on fishbase


11

Cetaceans (i.e., marine mammals) evolved from certain ancient land based mammals, thus the tail is essentially convergent evolution of the tail function.


11

Short answer There is no evidence whatsoever that the parasitic arthropod Cymothoa exigua develops itself into a functional tongue. Instead, it consumes the fish's tongue and occupies the freed buccal space to continue feeding onto the fish's blood or mucus. Background The linked wikipedia page that states that Cymothoa exigua arthropods form fully ...


11

Its a Giant Gourami, Osphronemus goramy. The giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy) is a freshwater species believed to be native to Southeast Asia, and has been introduced to other parts of the world. This species is commercially important as a food fish and an aquarium fish. (Source: tropical-fish-keeping) Reference: fishbase


11

I can't support this answer with scholarly articles. But it's an interesting question if you think of milk as highly polluted water. Water from a tap (which is what goldfish usually live in) is 'fairly pure', with the naturally occurring minerals sodium, calcium, magnesium and potassium respectively in highest concentrations (varies by location.) Milk, on ...


11

The second fish looks like a rock gunnel (or Butterfish; Pholis gunnellus). This is an eel-like fish found in the intertidal and subtidal zones of the North Atlantic. Interestingly, the rock gunnel is capable of remaining above the waterline at low tide and breathing air. According to Campbell (1984): Fully grown adults can reach 30 cm in length. A ...


10

Answer The mechanism for salmon natal homing isn't exactly known, but there are really two good hypotheses out there. Salmon have an extremely good sense of smell. One hypothesis is that they retain an imprint of their birthplace's odor, and manage to recognize it again at a later time (as explained by this article). Another hypothesis: the Earth's ...


10

If you have a man in a box scenario where you only look at numbers, the answer is, no, he won't last 14 days.[1] The difficulty with this question for me is that the body doesn't always behave the way it's supposed to. The 3-3-3 rule (3 minutes without air, 3 days without water, three weeks without food) and the "100 hour rule" (4.166 days) aren't absolutes....


10

Here is a specific account of a person surviving at sea drinking turtle blood, while eating some fish and drinking some rain water. Several peoples have a habit of drinking raw animal blood, at least for ritual purposes; here is a recent account. They probably drink more than a few spoons full so that the Lifescience article quoted by Ishi appears alarmist.


9

i think this is a frogfish. there is multiple types of this fish. i think this is an Ocellated frogfish. frogfishes related to anglerfishes. memorizing animals by classification eventually helps with identification. little google search and using fishbase site about information helps. this sites very helpful about finding fishes. fisbase frogfishes ...


9

It is Giant Stomach Worm (Hirudinella Ventricosa). It is a platyhelmith parasitic to Wahoo fish, feeding on its blood and found inside the stomach. It makes 98% of Wahoo's parasitic infections. It is a fleshy worm that varies in size and shape; with extended worms the size of a mans finger and contracted ones about the size of a walnut. It requires ...


8

This due to a phenomenon called "cold shock". This induces a number of physiological changes in the fishs metabolism and also in its behaviour and can lead to death. The first paper cites some reasons in table 1: Brain and central nervous system response: Changes in neuronal activity Catecholamine and corticosteroid response: Release of hormones due to ...


8

Introduction to phylogeny What makes that two species being closely related or not has nothing to do with whether they look a like or whether they live in similar environment. It has to do with their evolutionary history. Evolutionary history used to be inferred from phenotypic traits ('phenotype'≈'how an individual looks like') but today it is most often ...


7

Sharks sense their prey with the normal senses, they see, hear and smell them. They have a remarkable sensitive sense of smelling, which enables them to sense highly diluted traces of prey. They can also use their smelling to determine the direction where a certain smell comes from. This is achieved by the timing in which the senses arrive in different ...


7

The problem is that box jellyfish doesn't specify one jellyfish but a group of different jellyfish. Some of these are highly venomous - I pick here Chironex fleckeri, as this is often called "the most venomous jellyfish in the world". Chironex fleckeri has long tentacles which are covered with millions of explosive cells called Cnidocytes which inject a ...


7

Fertilized fish eggs are known as Fish seeds. In simple words, they are the baby fishes used for seeding new Ponds in fisheries. They can be used in 4 stages: Hatchling : Larvae stage where it have yolk sac hanging below from where it draws its nutrition for 2–3 days. It can't eat from outside as mouth is not formed yet! Spawn: Stage where mouth is formed....


7

It looks like a unicornfish (genus Naso), maybe Naso vlamingii, the Bignose Unicornfish. They're Acanthurids, related to surgeonfishes and tangs. These are mainly found in Indo-Pacific ocean around the depth of 50 mts from surface. Coral reefs are their main habitat and destruction of coral reefs is their current biggest threat alongside trading by ...


7

Connective tissues prevent fish from being hurt by its bones. They surround the sharp bones so that the bones do not hurt its organs/flesh. However Of course the bones can hurt the fish, but the situation is quite imaginable. If a fish is smashed or gets too much force, its connective tissues cannot protect its organs much(like our clothes cannot protect ...


6

I can't answer your third, but I can answer your first two. With one word, in fact: Bioluminescence http://brightnepenthe.blogspot.com/2010/08/palate-cleanser-90.html That's the deep ocean at night for ya. Unlike underground environments and caves, it's not pitch black pretty much anywhere in the ocean. There are things to see everywhere, and they play an ...


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