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I tried to break down your question into smaller parts and answer them individually: Q. What is immunity? A. Simply put, immunity is the ability to react to an infectious agent and stop it from causing disease. Q. Do vaccines make you immune to infectious diseases? A. Yes, by definition. If it doesn't make you immune, it's not a vaccine. Q. Can we get ...


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Usually not. the Crispr/Cas proteins can be delivered to the cell as DNA/RNA and the proteins will only exist inside the cell in low numbers. Even in systems that deliver the protein from the outside in vivo almost always the proteins would be encapsulated in a delivery system to ensure they and any necessary accompanying nucleic acids get into the cell. ...


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The complexity of the immune response requires foreign proteins to be bound first by presenting cells which happen to be like macrophages - cells that are like garbage disposals. Why some proteins are simply gobbled up and yet others are preserved and presented to the resident T cell helper population is related to the size and sequence of the protein. In ...


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All cells chew up internal proteins all the time - it's part of the normal activity of cells to recycle those proteins into amino acids to be rebuilt into other proteins. The first step is chopping up the protein into peptides by the proteasome. When a virus infects a cell, one key thing it needs to do to replicate is to have the cell start making viral ...


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