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They only tested 3 heat treatment regimens: 56C/30min, 60C/60min, 92C/15min (6 if you consider the "with BSA" and "without BSA", but only 3 combinations of temperature and time). They didn't measure the time required at certain temperatures to get to a certain level of inactivation. It seems they chose some of these particular protocols ...


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As you say it is possible to increase the temperature of the steam over the saturation pressure. And with overheated steam, the instrument would reach the desired temperature as is the case in an autoclave. But the difference is how many time it would take to heat the sterilized instruments. And the difference is actually huge, we are talking of order of ...


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it would be much simpler to further heat the steam at the ambient pressure of the autoclave room You cannot do that, physically. If you put water in a closed (water-vapor-tight) container, then heat it, the vapor "wants" to expand with growing temperature. But as it cannot expand your metal container (autoclave), the pressure goes up instead. It happens ...


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An autoclave can sterilize both solids and liquids, whereas an oven with no pressure control is typically not suitable to sterilize liquids. Not only do you need to heat the chamber to 121°C, but you also need to make sure that the things you are trying to sterilize are not degraded by the treatment. For dry objects (e.g. glassware) you could heat the ...


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