45

This actually looks like a Gaudy Sphinx caterpillar (Eumorpha labruscae). It only mimics the appearance of a snake! You can find more information about this species here. Range: Argentina north through Central America, Mexico, and the West Indies to Florida, Mississippi, South Texas, and Arizona. Strays to Missouri, southern Michigan, Pennsylvania, Maine, ...


44

Adult butterflies don't eat! I mean.... not in the sense of chewing on food. They rather drink. They get their nutrients via ingestion of liquid substances. Their mouth consists of a long tube called a proboscis that acts as a straw. What do butterflies feed on? The vast majority of butterflies eat nectar from flowers. Many species are quite specialized ...


24

Several species of the order Lepidoptera don't feed at all in adult form, surviving entirely on the reserves made while they were larva. Two examples I'm aware of are the Atlas moth (as well as most of the family it belongs to) and the clothing moth. Also, many butterflies and moths which normally do feed stop doing so after the mating (for males) or after ...


14

I think it's just a case bearing moth larva (Tinea pellionella). Source: http://www.hantsmoths.org.uk/


9

I think I have found the identification. It is a planthopper from ricaniidae family. Most likely Ricanula stigmatica. Image source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ricanula_stigmatica


9

This looks like the Satyr Comma or Polygonia satyrus. Characteristic of this species is a dark border near the tops of wings, fading near the bottom. They are common across the Western United States and Southern Canada. For more information on this species, try this link and this link. To differentiate between moths and butterflies you can look at the ...


9

Looks like the larvae of an elephant hawk moth (Deilephila elpenor). Green Variant. ©2005 Henk Wallays (CC BY-NC 3.0) In the Sphingidae family (like the snake-mimic caterpillar in this post). Description: typically brown-gray color with black dots along length of body. Young larvae are yellowish-white or green, but some mature larvae also can be green ...


8

I think this is the "Dark Evening Brown" or Melanitis phedima possibly Melanitis phedima bela: Some further information can be found here (image 1) and here (image 2). If you look close at the second image, you can see the spot on the wing. Why they are coming into the houses is something I can only speculate about, but probably they are either attracted ...


8

They look like the caterpillars of Alope sphinx (Erinnyis alope) There is a webpage on a dedicated website here: https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Erinnyis-alope Among the pictures in the linked website you can find one with the green and brown morphs/stages of the caterpillars.


6

This is a tussock moth caterpillar in the Lymantriidae family. The image is not clear enough for a definitive ID, but it appears you have some species in the genus Orgyia. Likely, this is a white-marked tussock moth caterpillar (Orgyia leucostigma). From Auburn University: The full-grown larva (Photo 2) is around 35 mm long. The head and shield on ...


6

It resembles Pelagodes antiquadraria, which belongs to the moth genus Pelagodes in the family Geometridae. Image Source: FlickRiver


6

This appears to be a Gastropacha Quercifolia, the Lappet Moth. It is found in Europe and Northern and Eastern Asia. The wingspan is 50–90 mm. The females are larger than the males. The moth flies from June to July depending on the location. Source


6

Based on the image of the moth, I think this is a Painted Tiger Moth (Arachnis picta). See the image of the moth from the Wikipedia (you can even see the yellow color at the head region): An image of the caterpillar can be found here, but this is less decisive. It also fits with the geographic location where you found the moth, see here.


6

That, I believe to be the larvae of an Indian Mealmoth Plodia interpunctella, but it could also be Tineola bisselliella or Tinea pellionella. It's definitely emerging from a pupa, and it's definitely a moth larva, but I'd need more information for an accurate identification. To Google images


5

As to your question why they come into the house: Some butterflies survive winter (hibernate) on a dry, cool but frost-free place such as parts of houses that are not heated. In autumn they actively search for such places. I often find them in a wood stack or on the attic. In Europe, examples are Gonepteryx rhamni, Polygonia c-album and Inachis io. I think ...


5

This is likely a case-bearing clothes moth (Tinea pellionella). Though more information and a better image would aid in confirming that to be the case. Here are some pictures:


5

Looks like a six-spot burnet (Zygaena filipendulae) Diurnal moth of the Zygaenidae family. Description: has a wingspan of 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in)...The fore wings are dark metallic green with six vivid red spots (sometimes the spots are merged causing possible confusion with other species such as the five-spot burnet). Occasionally, the spots are yellow ...


4

Looks like a greenish variant of Hemileuca maia – the Buck Moth, which according to here does occur in Oklahoma. This source also suggests that touching the caterpillar (or its relatives) is a bad idea... Source: statebystategardening


4

Picture is not very good, but I think this might be an Eastern Buckmoth Hemileuca maia caterpillar. Photo credit: Gary L. Spicer ; Source: butterfliesandmoths.org Description: From the University of Kentucky: The two-inch long Buck Moth caterpillar is brown to purplish-black with numerous yellow spots. The body is protected with branched reddish ...


3

I believe that it is the vine hawk moth (Choerocampa rosetta). https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2010/11/20/vine-hawk-moth/


3

I didn't watch the game, but from what I've seen on the internet it was the Silver Y (Autographa gamma), drawn there by the lights while migrating http://theconversation.com/moths-expert-match-report-on-ronaldo-insect-encounter-at-euro-2016-final-62314


3

I couldn't really be completely sure by this picture alone so I did some searching around and turns out it is a Autographa Gamma(Silver Y)


3

It is a moth and all moths and butterflies belong to the order of Lepidoptera. Based on the shape of the forewing and the orange color of the hindwings I think this moth belongs to the genus Catocala https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catocala, see also here for some pictures. EDIT: theforestecologist did a excellent suggestion that this might be Catocala ...


3

Oleander Hawkmoth (Daphnis nerii) Same fellow? (From oocities.org) And a better picture from ukmoths.org.uk: For more reading, here's a wiki article.


3

Although the images are very grainy and oddly lit, the second two images look a lot like a pantry moth. Specifically, it reminds me of a very common pantry pest: Plodia interpunctella (Indian-meal moth). Source: Urban & Structural Entomology, Texas A&M University, USA Range: [source] The Indian-meal moth can be found on all inhabited ...


3

That is an Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella. Family Pyralidae. They are very common household pests. https://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/indian_meal_moth.htm They breed in grains or cereals. You need to look through your pantry, and find out what they have been breeding in. Seal up your grains and cereals in plastic, or put them all in the fridge.


3

This is very likely a chrysalis (or pupa) stage of a lepidopteran. A similar looking example belongs to the giant swallowtail butterfly (Papilio cresphontes). Source: Bill Frank P. cresphontes is found in southern California [source], so it would not be unreasonable to find it in Simi Valley.


2

It is an pink flannelmoth because there is no other insect which ressembles it Usually pinkflannelmoths have orange coloured centers


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